BRAIN RAVE; Scientists Say We're at the Limits of Our Intelligence. So Here Are Some Fascinating Facts to Tickle Your Cerebrum

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

BRAIN RAVE; Scientists Say We're at the Limits of Our Intelligence. So Here Are Some Fascinating Facts to Tickle Your Cerebrum


Byline: Brian McIver

yours with today...

BRAIN RAVE 1Every and 40 per cent white matter.

one of us, even stupid people, use 100 per cent of their brains. The popular myth 5Within those four lobes, the brain is also divided into symmetrical left 9We all experience an The grey matter is the neuron cells and white matter is the IT'S the most powerful super computer on earth and the ultimate example of bioelectrical engineering.

But according to the latest scientific updates, the human brain has stopped growing.

New research has suggested our little grey cells have reached their peak of evolution and are not going to grow any stronger or more powerful, throwing long-held predictions of ever-developing and evolving cognitive skills into doubt.

The study is based on research into growth in connection between cells and consumption of energy in the organ.

It implies that after millions of years of evolution and the giant developmental steps from cavemen onwards, the massive growth in brain power may now be at a plateau.

The brain consumes 20 per cent of all your body's energy despite making up only two per cent of its mass.

Simon Laughlin, a professor in neurobiology at Cambridge University, has found that the brain would simply require too much more energy than the body can spare to power any development.

Another reason mooted is that the key system of cell miniaturisation in the brain is at physical capacity levels and unable to develop as many new connections.

So if the modern human brain is as good as the race is ever going to get, here are 20 facts all about the grey matter to fill yours with today...

1 Every one of us, even stupid people, use 100 per cent of their brains. The popular myth that we only use 10 per cent of the brain is scientifically incorrect. Volumes of science fiction have been devoted to the X-Men or Heroes-style powers that we are just waiting to unleash in the mysteriously dormant 90 per cent that remained, but it is a myth just the same.

2 The average human brain weighs 400g at birth, around 1.4kg in adulthood and has a volume of 1,130 cubic centimetres. Average dimensions are 140mm wide, 167mm long and 93mm high.

3 Brain weight does not relate to intelligence. For example, Albert Einstein's brain weighed 1.23g less than the human average. Although, rather unsurprisingly, it was some 35 per cent wider in the part of the brain that deals with mathematics.

located.

4 The brain is divided into four lobes. The Frontal lobe controls decision making, reasoning and long-term memory. The Parietal lobe is where sensory information and numbers are calculated. The Occipital lobe includes the visual cortex for sight and dreams.

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