Migraine Isn't Simply a Headache

Manila Bulletin, August 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Migraine Isn't Simply a Headache


Q:I suffer from migraine about once every several months, usually when I sleep late for several nights in a row. I know when I'm going to have a migraine because I have blurring of vision about 30 minutes before I experience severe right sided headache. What causes migraine? What can be taken to lessen the pain of, or prevent, an attack of migraine? ---Myrna L., Makati City

MANILA, Philippines -- A: The type of migraine you suffer from is called classical migraine, a condition that presents as throbbing or pulsating headache, usually one sided, that is preceded (by 20 to 60 minutes) by an aura that often consists of a visual disturbance like blurring of vision, or perception of flashes of lights, halos, stars, blind spots, etc.

Aside from classical migraine, there are many other types of migraine and in most the headache is not heralded by an aura. There is also such a thing as headache-free migraine, where there is an aura but without a headache. Thus, contrary to common perception, migraine is not simply a headache because there may in fact be none. Rather, it is a poorly understood condition that is characterized by a series of changes among the cells of, followed by complex changes in blood flow to, certain areas of the brain. The blood flow changes include initial narrowing followed by widening of certain blood vessels of the brain. The widening of the blood vessels is believed to activate nearby pain receptors and give rise to headache.

Migraine headache varies in location, character, intensity and duration from person to person and from one migraine attack to another in the same person. Typically, though, an attack usually starts as pain on one side of the head that is aggravated by physical activity, coughing, straining, sounds, odors and light. An assortment of other signs and symptoms often accompany migraine headache including loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, numbness, tingling, weakness, dislike for sound, light and certain smells, temporary paralysis of a limb, ringing of the ear, speech difficulty, temporary blindness, confusion and disorientation.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Migraine Isn't Simply a Headache
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.