Get off to Flying Start at the Newest College; Electronics Student Patrick Finds Taking a Course at City of Glasgow Is the Ideal Route to Landing a Job in Air Traffic Control

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

Get off to Flying Start at the Newest College; Electronics Student Patrick Finds Taking a Course at City of Glasgow Is the Ideal Route to Landing a Job in Air Traffic Control


SCOTLAND'S newest and largest college may be less than a year old but it has already proved to be a major draw to students.

Formed in September 2010, City of Glasgow College's scale and range of courses have made it particularly attractive to those seeking further education.

Today, about 40,000 students from 130 countries can choose to study from 2600 courses at one of its three main campuses, expertly guided by some 1200 members of staff.

Based in the heart of the city, it was created from the merger of Glasgow Metropolitan College, Central College Glasgow and Glasgow College of Nautical Studies.

More than 500 full-time courses are run within 12 specialist schools.

They are: art and design; built environment and construction; business and enterprise; community, care and social science; computing; creative industries; energy, engineering and science; food, hospitality and tourism; hair and beauty; languages and ESOL; nautical studies and sport.

Courses are available from access level, where no formal qualifications are required, through to NQ, HNC/D and even degree level programmes, with further progression routes to a range of universities.

Students are supported by facilities that include TV, radio, photography and design studios to a training restaurant, bakery, hair and beauty salon and ship simulator.

These training environments ensure students are prepared for the demands of industry and offer excellent links to employers throughout the city for work placements and partnerships.

The college also caters for those looking to polish their skills, retrain or find a new hobby.

Hundreds of evening and weekend courses are available in everything from languages, design, food and ICT through to professional qualifications.

These courses can range from eight weeks to three years and offer a great way to work around other commitments.

Planning for a new campus on Cathedral Street and Thistle Street is continuing.

A Marine Skills Centre based at Thistle Street is the first phase, providing state-of-the-art facilities for maritime students.

towards the next stage with a planned completion date of 2016.

HNC electronics student Patrick McCartan, who is training to be an air traffic control engineer at Edinburgh Airport, found the new college a great place to study.

Patrick, 24, from Johnstone, said: "I had worked on a few building sites but felt I needed to do something more to increase my chances of getting a better job."

Not long after graduating from the school of energy, engineering and science with his HNC, Patrick was offered a place on the National Air Traffic Services engineering technician training scheme. …

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