Pellicano Target: 'I Was Scared Every Day'

By Aurthur, Kate | Newsweek, August 15, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pellicano Target: 'I Was Scared Every Day'


Aurthur, Kate, Newsweek


Byline: Kate Aurthur

Threatened and phone-tapped, journalist Anita Busch picks up the pieces.

Anita Busch would like her life back. Nothing has been the same for her since June 20, 2002, when she found her car vandalized--someone had damaged the windshield, leaving a dead fish with a rose in its mouth and a note with one word on it: "Stop." Over the following months, someone tried to run her down, her computer's hard drive was wiped out, and a repairman found equipment on her phone that turned out to be a tap.

The person ultimately found guilty of threatening her: notorious private investigator Anthony Pellicano, now serving a 15-year sentence for this and other crimes, including wire fraud and racketeering.

Busch was an entertainment reporter at the time, working on an investigative series for the Los Angeles Times about celebrities and their potential connections to organized crime. She had also written in the past for The New York Times on the fall of Michael Ovitz, the once all-powerful agent who had started a doomed management company. She says there were plenty of people who would have wanted her silence.

"I was scared every day," Busch, now 50, says about the months she lived in terror. Every time she started her car, she feared it would explode. She had nightmares. She stayed with friends and her parents until she realized they were scared to house her. "My peace of mind was completely obliterated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pellicano Target: 'I Was Scared Every Day'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.