Keep an Eye on Your Pet's Behavior to Monitor His Health

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Keep an Eye on Your Pet's Behavior to Monitor His Health


I hit my toe on the kitchen table leg last night. I don't know if I broke it or not but it sure did hurt.I put some ice on it, which helped, and limped around for the rest of the evening.

It didn't hurt as much in the morning but walking on it reminded me of my contact with the furniture.

Sometimes it's not so easy to know whenmy dogs are in pain.Cocoa, our rescue German shepherd, taught me a lot about being aware of a dog's physical state.

She had several physical conditions that were genetically based and needed to be monitored. While dealing with Cocoa's hip and spine problems, I met a veterinarian who gave my dog chiropractic and acupuncture treatments.

When Cocoa started to "bunny hop," running with her hind legs moving together, it was time for a chiropractic treatment.I had been taught how to read her body language.

According to healthypet.com, our dogs naturally hide their pain to protect themselves from predators, so they may be in distress without showing any obvious signs.We need to observe their behavior to help us manage their pain.The American Animal Hospital Association provides five clues to help us read our dogs' body language.

The first is abnormal chewing habits.If our pets are showing abnormal chewing habits,for example, dropping food or chewing food on one side of his mouth, he may have a mouth tumor or dental disorder. Additional clues may be excessive face rubbing, bad breath or weight loss.Routine dental checkups are important to treat and prevent dental disorders and related pain.

The second clue is drastic weight gain or loss.The AAHA notes pain directly influences your pet's weight and eating habits.Overweight animals have an increased chance of tearing ligaments and damaging joints.Pets with muscle soreness or arthritis may not want to access food because bending over is uncomfortable.

Arthritis pain may cause our pets to gain weight because their eating habits remain the same, but their exercise level is reduced.Pain can also cause our pets' to lose their appetite, leading to a weight loss.

Third is avoiding affection or handling.According to the AAHA, avoiding affection or handling may be a sign of a progressive disease such as osteoarthritis or intervertebral disc disease.Your dog may appear to be normal before handling or petting him, but the added pressure applied to his body may expose sensitive and painful areas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Keep an Eye on Your Pet's Behavior to Monitor His Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.