APHA 139th Annual Meeting and Exposition Oct 29-Nov 2, 2011 Washington, DC

The Nation's Health, August 2011 | Go to article overview
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APHA 139th Annual Meeting and Exposition Oct 29-Nov 2, 2011 Washington, DC


Join your colleagues for the most important public health event of the year. Learn, teach, network, mentor, socialize and most of all make a difference! With more than 1,000 cutting edge scientific sessions focusing on the latest public health challenges, 700 booths of information and state-of-the-art public health products and services and career opportunities available at the Public Health CareerMart, this is a meeting you can't afford to miss.

Healthly Communities Promote Healthly Minds and Bodies

The 139th APHA Annual Meeting theme "Healthy Communities Promote Healthy Minds and Bodies" provides the perfect platform for an in-depth look at efforts to improve the health of our communities. Public health starts in the communities where we live, work and play.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." Health is influenced by a complex interaction of factors including housing, transportation options, access to health care and healthy foods, education, neighborhood safety, air and water quality and social networks. As a result, communities with limited access to these resources are more likely to experience poorer health.

A healthy communities approach recognizes that physical and social environments and community resources heavily impact health behavior. Through integrated systems and policy changes we can create long-term sustainable opportunities to enhance health. Join APHA as we explore some successful community models and discuss how these practices can be adopted to reduce health disparities and improve health outcomes for all.

APHA in Washington, DC

The APHA Annual Meeting & Exposition is the place to experience cutting edge public health education and networking opportunities! Learn from experts in the field, hear about the latest research and exceptional best practices. Discover the newest public health products and services and share new perspectives on public health with your peers. Now is the time to be involved.

Visitors to Washington, DC enjoy access to an impressive list of free and fascinating attractions, from the powerful monuments and memorials on the National Mall to inspiring cultural treasures like the Smithsonian Institution, Library of Congress and National Gallery of Art. A diverse and beautiful world capital, DC invites visitors to step beyond these federal landmarks to explore charming neighborhoods like historic Georgetown, eclectic Adams-Morgan and trendy U Street. DC's neighborhoods tempt visitors with chic boutiques, hip new restaurants and bars, world-class theatres, art galleries and peaceful parks and gardens. Thanks to DC's pedestrian-friendly streets and its safe, efficient public transportation system, it's easy to get from your hotel to Washington, DC's attractions.

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OPENING/CLOSING GENERAL SESSIONS.

Opening General Session | Sunday, October 30 * 12:00 pm-2:00 pm

Tom Daschle

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One of the country's most respected former senators, Senator Tom Daschle has crossed party lines throughout his extensive career in public service, working with both Democrats and Republicans to make a difference in the lives of millions of Americans. He began his political career while serving on the staff of Senator James Abourezk. In 1978, he was elected to the US House of Representatives and in 1986 to the US Senate. Daschle later became the Senate Democratic Leader.

In 2007, Daschle joined with former Majority Leaders George Mitchell, Bob Dole and Howard Baker to create the Bipartisan Policy Center, an organization dedicated to finding common ground on pressing public policy challenges.

Daschle plays an integral role in many organizations including the Center for American Progress, the Health Policy and Management Executive Council at the Harvard School of Public Health, the Global Policy Advisory Council for the Health Worker Migration Initiative, the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees, the GE Healthymagination Advisory Board, the National Integrated Foodsystem Advisory Board, and the Committee on Collaborative Initiatives at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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APHA 139th Annual Meeting and Exposition Oct 29-Nov 2, 2011 Washington, DC
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