Report: Cohabitation a Threat to Child Welfare; 'Multiple Transitions' and Lack of Stability Cited

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Report: Cohabitation a Threat to Child Welfare; 'Multiple Transitions' and Lack of Stability Cited


Byline: Cheryl Wetzstein, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Cohabiting is an emerging threat to the health of children and society, two new research reports say.

In the latter half of the 20th century, divorce posed the biggest threat to marriage in the United States, sociology professor W. Bradford Wilcox and 17 other scholars said in a report released this week by the Institute for American Values' Center for Marriage and Families and the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia.

That is no longer the case, they said.

Today, the rise of cohabiting households with children is the largest unrecognized threat to the quality and stability of children's family lives, the scholars said in Why Marriage Matters, Third Edition: Thirty Conclusions From the Social Sciences.

Cohabiting relationships are prone to instability, with multiple transitions and breakups. Children are less likely to thrive in such homes and may even be exposed to abuse from unrelated persons in their homes, the report says.

The growing instability of American family life also means that contemporary adults and children are more likely to live in what scholars call 'complex households,'" it added. There is scant research on homes in which children live with half-siblings, stepsiblings, stepparents and stepchildren, but the initial findings are not encouraging.

Mr. Wilcox, who directs the National Marriage Project, and his colleagues cautioned that while cohabitation is associated with increased risks of psychological and social problems for children, this does not mean that every child who is exposed to cohabitation is damaged.

Still, the risks are real, they said: In one study of children aged 6 to 11, about 16 percent of children in cohabiting homes had serious emotional problems. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Report: Cohabitation a Threat to Child Welfare; 'Multiple Transitions' and Lack of Stability Cited
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.