Impact Evaluation of EU Funds: Examples in Infrastructure projects/ES Fondu Poveikio Vertinimas: Infrastrukturos Projektu Pavyzdziai

By Spiridonovs, Jurijs | Business: Theory and Practice, June 2011 | Go to article overview

Impact Evaluation of EU Funds: Examples in Infrastructure projects/ES Fondu Poveikio Vertinimas: Infrastrukturos Projektu Pavyzdziai


Spiridonovs, Jurijs, Business: Theory and Practice


1. Introduction

Pawel Samecki, European Commissioner in charge of Regional Policy defined Cohesion policy's goals as follows (2009): to enhance competitiveness and employment at the regional level; to facilitate growth in the lagging areas of the Union; to foster integration across borders. EU Cohesion Fund is one of the EU's regional policy and financial instruments, which aims to bridge between the existing national economic and social disparities. It is meant to fund large-scale infrastructure development activities (projects) in environmental protection and transport sectors.

Being defined as an investment priority the sector of transport infrastructures as well as sector of environmental infrastructure (as part of public infrastructure) frequently faces the issue of efficiency since there is not a single reliable concept of measuring possible impact of interventions in place. The issue of measuring the impact comprises itself in other possible components: impact of what, on what and for whom or in other words if policymakers must decide whether to expand, contract or maintain a program, or simply want to improve it, they need more than accountability information, they need to learn what works and what doesn't, and why. Thus, evaluating the impact of (cohesion) policy does involve a variety of cognitive tasks, with varying degrees of complexity (Martini 2009).

The present paper overlooks the issue of impact evaluation in the field of public investment projects and the goal is to complement ongoing debates on the efficiency of the policy.

2. Overlook of Cohesion policy

According to Community strategic guidelines on economic, social and territorial cohesion, 2007-2013 the programmes supported by Cohesion policy should seek to target resources on the following three priorities (European Council 2006):

1) improving the attractiveness of Member States, regions and cities by improving accessibility, ensuring adequate quality and level of services, and preserving the environment;

2) encouraging innovation, entrepreneurship and the growth of the knowledge economy by research and innovation;

3) capacities including new information and communication technologies, and creating more and better jobs by attracting more people into employment or entrepreneurial activity, improving adaptability of workers and enterprises and increasing investment in human capital.

Present planning period follows previous programming periods, which are described as successful in making difference to standards of living across European Union (European Commission 2007), not very effective (de la Fuente 2003) and failed to deliver a satisfactory growth performance (Sapir et al. 2004). Some researchers note that no evidence is found that the policies adopted are the most appropriate (Boldrin, Canova 2001) and the Cohesion Funds should be terminated with the end of the previous spending cycle (2006) (Boldrin, Canova 2003).

Fig. 1 shows changes in amount of available EU financial resources for implementation of Cohesion policy.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Financial instruments and initiatives to address economics and social imbalances at Community level did exist since the beginning of European integration but only in 1986 legal foundations introduced by the Single European Act paved the way for an integrated cohesion policy. During the period 1957-1988, the European Social Fund (ESF, since 1958), the European Agricultural Guidance and Guarantee Fund (EAGGF, since 1962), and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF, since 1975) co-financed projects which had been selected beforehand by Member States. EU Cohesion Fund is one of the EU's regional policy and financial instruments, which aims to bridge between the existing national economic and social disparities. It is meant to fund large-scale infrastructure development activities (projects) in environmental protection and transport sectors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Impact Evaluation of EU Funds: Examples in Infrastructure projects/ES Fondu Poveikio Vertinimas: Infrastrukturos Projektu Pavyzdziai
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.