Producing Articles for Academic Special Librarians: An Analysis of Several Peer-Reviewed Journals Found That Librarians at Schools with Large Endowments And/or Enrollments Are Most Likely to Publish, Particularly If It Is Required for Tenure and Promotion

By Hardin, Amy | Information Outlook, July-August 2011 | Go to article overview

Producing Articles for Academic Special Librarians: An Analysis of Several Peer-Reviewed Journals Found That Librarians at Schools with Large Endowments And/or Enrollments Are Most Likely to Publish, Particularly If It Is Required for Tenure and Promotion


Hardin, Amy, Information Outlook


Every day, college and university librarians specializing in science, engineering, agriculture, medicine, business, law, social services, music, art, historic preservation, and other areas help faculty members get their scholarly articles published. Both professors and special librarians know that the number of articles a university produces plays a significant role in raising a school's ranking in US News & World Report. However, it might surprise many faculty members to know that at more than 400 schools in the United States, these librarians are also contributing significantly to their own professional literature.

To measure the extent of these contributions, the BioMedical & Life Sciences Division of the Special Libraries Association, along with the Academic Division and the College and University Business Libraries Section of the Business & Finance Division, put together a presentation titled "So, They Say You Have to Publish." The presentation, developed in conjunction with SLA's 2011 Annual Conference and with the generous support of the Routledge imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, explored the phenomenon of subject specialists publishing in key library and information science journals in their respective fields. At the close of the talk, the names of the U.S. universities whose librarians published the most papers in 14 peer-reviewed journals that are emblematic of some of the largest specialties encompassed by SLA and its sister organizations were announced (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Leading U.S. Research Universities Ranked by Articles
Published for Subject Specialist Librarians 2000-2010

1   Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign        112

2   Rutgers at New Brunswick & UMDNJ System       51

3   Univ. of California at Los Angeles            47

4   Pennsylvania State Univ. at University Park   46

5   Univ. of Minnesota at Twin Cities             44

5   Purdue Univ. at West Lafayette                44

7   Michigan State Univ. at East Lansing          42

8   Univ. of Texas at Austin                      40

9   Indiana Univ. at Bloomington                  39

10  Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill        38

11  Northern Illinois Univ. at DeKalb             36

11  Univ. at Buffalo NY                           36

13  Cornell Univ                                  35

13  Univ. of Michigan at Ann Arbor                35

15  Harvard Univ                                  34

16  Ohio State Univ. at Columbus                  31

16  Texas A&M                                     31

18  Univ. of Rochester                            30

19  Univ. of Arizona at Tucson                    29

19  Univ. of Arkansas at Fayetteville             29

19  Yale Univ                                     29

22  New York Univ                                 28

23  City Univ. of New York                        26

23  Univ. of Pittsburgh                           26

25  Univ. of Colorado at Boulder                  25

25  Duke Univ                                     25

27  Univ. of Alabama at Tuscaloosa                23

27  Univ. of Maryland at College Park             23

29  Univ. of California at Berkeley               22

29  Univ. of Florida at Gainesville               22

31  Univ. of Southern California                  21

32  Univ. of Nebraska at Lincoln                  20

32  Southern Illinois Univ. at Carbondale         20

32  Stony Brook Univ                              20

35  Iowa State Univ. at Ames                      19

35  Oregon State at Corvallis                     19

37  Univ. of Oregon & Oregon Health Sciences U    18

37  Univ. of Tennessee at Knoxville               18

39  Louisiana State Univ. at Baton Rouge          17

39  Univ. of Washington at Seattle                17

41  Mayo Medical School at Rochester              16

42  Arizona State Univ. … 

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Producing Articles for Academic Special Librarians: An Analysis of Several Peer-Reviewed Journals Found That Librarians at Schools with Large Endowments And/or Enrollments Are Most Likely to Publish, Particularly If It Is Required for Tenure and Promotion
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