'Pride' vs. Patriotism; Participation in July Fourth Celebrations Is America's Real Divide

By Barber, Matt | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 23, 2011 | Go to article overview

'Pride' vs. Patriotism; Participation in July Fourth Celebrations Is America's Real Divide


Barber, Matt, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Matt Barber, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

To the modern Democratic National Committee, the mainstream media and other progressive outfits such as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the words patriot and patriotism have become synonymous with right-wing extremism.

It's little wonder why. Context is everything. When your point of view originates from so far out in the leftosphere that it takes the Hubble Space Telescope to spot the center of our political universe, Mom, God and apple pie tend to look like fiery comets hurling toward your bugged-out, bohemian planetoid.

Exhibit A? Liberals' mouth-frothing hatred of the Tea Party and the constitutionalist principles for which it stands. Mark Potok, Huffington Post columnist and spokesweasel for the hard-left SPLC, sneeringly refers to the Tea Party as the Patriot movement and mendaciously warns that its supporters are shot through with rich veins of radical ideas, conspiracy theories and racism. Harrumph!

Divisive rhetoric is nothing new. John Edwards hit a recurring theme during his 2004 presidential bid: There are two Americas, he would say, one for the haves and one for the have-nots. This, of course, was a simple sound-bite play of the left's favorite trump card: class warfare.

Still, Mr. Edwards had it partly right. There are two Americas, but more than along economic lines, these two Americas are divided by competing and polarized worldviews.

Interestingly, the America within which one lives might best be reflected by the parade one chooses to attend.

A recent Harvard University study found that those who attend Fourth of July parades, for instance, are more likely to be, or to become, right-wingers.

[T]here is a political congruence between the patriotism promoted on Fourth of July and the values associated with the Republican party, wrote researchers in a paper headlined Shaping the Nation: Estimating the Impact of Fourth of July Using a Natural Experiment.

Fourth of July celebrations in the United States shape the nation's political landscape by forming beliefs and increasing participation, primarily in favor of the Republican Party, they warned.

Additionally, the researchers were surprised to find that important childhood events can have a permanent impact on political beliefs and behavior and that such patriotic events socialize children into Republicans.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Pride' vs. Patriotism; Participation in July Fourth Celebrations Is America's Real Divide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.