TURNING THE TELEGRAPH TABLES; Education Reporter LUCY LYNCH Takes a Close-Up Look at a New Measure of How Your Child's School Is Doing - and Two Experts Give Opposing Views on Its Introduction

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), August 24, 2011 | Go to article overview
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TURNING THE TELEGRAPH TABLES; Education Reporter LUCY LYNCH Takes a Close-Up Look at a New Measure of How Your Child's School Is Doing - and Two Experts Give Opposing Views on Its Introduction


Byline: LUCY LYNCH

THE Government has a new way of measuring pupils' success in traditional academic subjects.

The English Baccalaureate has now taken its place alongside GCSE results as a barometer of how well schools are performing.

Though not presently a qualification, it is a measure for recording pupils who have secured a C grade or better across a core of academic subjects - English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language.

The government brought it in amid concerns over a huge rise in the number of non-academic qualifications being studied by secondary school pupils, which it argues do not carry real weight for entry to higher education or for getting a job.

But the system has its critics - some claim it is devaluing vocational subjects and was rushed in too quickly.

In recent years the main measure of a school's GCSE success has been how many pupils get at least five GCSEs C or above including English and maths.

The government says this will carry on being the main measure of school success rather than the English Baccalaureate.

But now the two measures appear side by side in the league tables and they show some glaring differences.

In the most recent tables, compiled from 2012 GCSE results, Coventry's Caludon Castle School recorded 68 per cent of pupils getting five good GCSEs including English and maths but just three per cent getting the English Baccalaureate.

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TURNING THE TELEGRAPH TABLES; Education Reporter LUCY LYNCH Takes a Close-Up Look at a New Measure of How Your Child's School Is Doing - and Two Experts Give Opposing Views on Its Introduction
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