Bank to the Future? Predictions from '86

American Banker, August 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Bank to the Future? Predictions from '86


Byline: Editorial Staff

In 1986, for our 150th-anniversary issue, American Banker asked dozens of bank CEOs to predict what the banking industry would look like today. Below are some of the responses; more at AmericanBanker.com.

"The financial services firm of the future will be comparable to the shopping complexes in the Quincy Market area in Boston, or Ghirardelli Square in San Francisco - arcades offering a wide array of products and services under one roof. Customers will be able to purchase all their financial services at one institution. ... Above all, customers will be different in the year 2011. They will have instant access to vast amounts of data via personal computers with telephone links. They will be better informed and will demand from us attractively priced, sophisticated products. ... The financial services industry is entering a stimulating new era of competition and technological change. And it is the customer who will benefit most."

James N. von Germeten, Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Co.

"Cross-selling will be for real and not a buzzword."

Harry B. Brock Jr., Central Bank of the South, Birmingham, Ala.

"Financial services firms will be more customer-sensitive than ever by the year 2011."

C.A. Cutchins 3rd, Sovran Financial Corp., Norfolk, Va.

"Information technology will allow clients to have services tailored precisely to their individual circumstances, almost to design their own accounts."

Frederick Heldring, Philadelphia National Bank

"I could easily see a Buck Rogers-type thing, an electronic checking account where you push a button or use a hand-held calculator to activate the account. We're going to be looking at a very accessible bank account with very little physical dimension to it that can be activated from remote areas, such as Europe, maybe with something the size of a calling card. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bank to the Future? Predictions from '86
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.