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Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

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End tax breaks for corporations

At a time when the free enterprise system needs to flourish and the size of government must shrink, I have an actionable first step to getting the nation back on track. End corporate welfare as we know it. Government should not be in the business of picking favorites and creating an uneven playing field.

Let's start with oil companies. Today oil companies enjoy massive federal tax breaks. Anyone who works hard and plays by the rules should be outraged. A cleanup of the tax code would be a great step forward in eliminating all federal subsidies from ethanol to windmills. We elected Bob Dold to Congress to help force President Obama to make tough fiscal choices with regard to subsidies and tax loopholes. If this is an issue Republicans and Democrats can agree on, what are we waiting for?

Chris Richards

Park City

Toll increase bullies drivers

The Illinois tollway does not need an outrageous 88 percent toll increase at this time.Even Director Bill Morris' proposed 38 percent increase is too much. How many people who drive the toll road have seen their incomes increase by 38 percent to 88 percent in recent years? Pay cuts of 38 percent to 88 percent are more likely.

Recently, the Daily Herald ran an article using a carefully selected group of toll roads in other states to make the Illinois toll increase look modest by comparison. Of the states not included in the article, consider Kentucky. Kentucky once had nine toll roads totaling over 650 miles more than double the Illinois tollway. But since November 2006, Kentucky has zero miles of toll road in their state.

What happened? They built the roads, paid-off the bonds and ended the toll burden. Also, their gasoline tax, state sales tax and income tax are all lower than Illinois'. Yet, their state finances are in much better shape than Illinois. It can be done.

Some of the projects the Illinois tollway proposes are of dubious value. For example, the proposed I-57/I-294 interchange project is strictly a gift to road contractors and unions, in true Blagojevich tradition. Life in the South suburbs will not improve one iota as a result of this project.

Bullies will always keep taking until the victims say "no." It's time to say "no" to increased tolls in Illinois.

Bill Edwards

Libertyville

After toll hikes, it's time to move

Thank you, Gov. Quinn, for making my life unbearable living in Illinois.

With all your taxes and cuts in programs and giving every company who threatens to leave the state tax breaks to stay here while putting the burden on the backs of us so-called little people with higher taxes, I am looking to move out of the state and go someplace where they don't bleed the money on the backs of their taxpayers.

The latest slap in the face higher tolls to pay for projects was the straw that broke the camel's back. You can soft-soap it all you want by saying we pay the lowest tolls in the country per mile than other states but at the same time, we are paying the highest taxes on gasoline than any other state.

Someone once said that tollways were supposed to pay for themselves and once paid for, the tolls would stop being collected. Just like the state's lottery was promised to pay for the schools. It is so easy to try to push your projects by saying that they will create more jobs for the unemployed to gain support but anyone with an ounce of brains should be able to see through that, so my only alternative is to move out of the state.

I am sure you wont give me any incentives to stay. …

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