Babies in Tune with Muzik4Kidz; Research Shows Music Boosts Child's Development

The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia), August 30, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Babies in Tune with Muzik4Kidz; Research Shows Music Boosts Child's Development


Byline: Sarah Green @thechronicle.com.au

PIANO music filled the room and little Eva Templeton's eyes lit up as she started clapping and dancing with her friends.

The two-year-old was in her weekly Muzik4Kidz class and by the smile on her face she was having the time of her life.

Her mother, Jody Templeton, said Eva, like all children, just loved music and it seemed the toddler even has a case of Bieber fever.

C[pounds sterling]Her favourites at the moment are Justin Bieber songs,C[yen] Mrs Templeton laughed.

C[pounds sterling]Music has always been an integral part of our lives.C[yen]

The mother and daughter have been attending the music program at a studio on Julia St with music educator Paula Melville-Clark since Eva was eight months old.

C[pounds sterling]I think it is invaluable. There is so much noise in the world. It is important to stop and think about what the children are hearing and provide a quality music education,C[yen] Mrs Templeton said.

Ms Melville-Clark is a well-known Australian music educator, accomplished pianist and a registered classroom teacher with more than 30 years of experience.

She writes and conducts Muzik4Kidz Music and Movement programs for children and teaches piano from her studio in Toowoomba for newborn, early childhood and primary.

C[pounds sterling]I'm very drawn to teaching music to young children because it's so rewarding and such a privilege to be involved with touching and shaping young lives,C[yen] Ms Melville-Clark said.

There is no disputing the value of music to children. Research shows music study increases all areas of a child's intellectual development as well as making them happy.

C[pounds sterling]Children are like little sponges soaking up information. They learn so much and so quickly and they are so desirous and full of energy,C[yen] she said.

C[pounds sterling]Young children always want to know what other instruments and props I have in the cupboard and what other songs I know. They want to have a go at playing the piano when I play. And they all want to hold hands with me in the circle or be the one to sit on my lap when we sing a song.

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