Autism Risk for Siblings Higher Than Thought

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 29, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Autism Risk for Siblings Higher Than Thought


Byline: Lindsey Tanner Associated Press

A new study suggests nearly one in five children with an autistic older sibling will develop the disorder too -- a rate much higher than previously thought.

Researchers followed 664 infants who had at least one older brother or sister with autism. Overall, 132 infants or about 19 percent ended up with an autism diagnosis, too, by their third birthdays. Previous smaller or less diverse studies reported a prevalence of between 3 percent and 14 percent.

"We were all a bit surprised and taken aback about how high it is," said lead author Sally Ozonoff, a psychiatry and behavioral sciences professor with the Mind Institute at the University of California at Davis.

The highest rates were in infants who had at least two older siblings with autism -- 32 percent of them also developed autism. Also, among boys with autistic siblings -- 26 percent developed autism versus 9 percent of girls. Autism is already known to be more common in boys.

The study involved 12 U.S. and Canadian sites and was published online in Pediatrics. Earlier studies were more local or involved fewer sites.

Ozonoff said parents of autistic children often ask her, "How likely am I to have another child" with autism? She said her study provides a more up-to-date answer.

However, Ozonoff noted that 80 percent of siblings studied did not develop autism, and that the prevalence rate was an average. It may be different for each family, depending on other risk factors they may face.

Autism has no known cause, but experts believe that genetics and external influences are involved. Research is examining whether these could include infections, pollution and other noninherited problems. Ozonoff noted that siblings often are exposed to similar outside influences, which could partly explain the study results.

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