Charles Darwin and His Apostles Have Go It All Wrong! Professor Felix I D Konotey-Ahulu (Pictured below) Uses This Review of Dr Carl Wieland's New Book, One Human Family-The Bible, Science, Race, and Culture, to Elaborate His Own Position on Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution, Racism and Science

By Konotey-Ahulu, Felix I. D. | New African, August-September 2011 | Go to article overview

Charles Darwin and His Apostles Have Go It All Wrong! Professor Felix I D Konotey-Ahulu (Pictured below) Uses This Review of Dr Carl Wieland's New Book, One Human Family-The Bible, Science, Race, and Culture, to Elaborate His Own Position on Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution, Racism and Science


Konotey-Ahulu, Felix I. D., New African


DR CARL WIELAND, AUTHOR OF the new book, One Human Family--The Bible, Science, Race, and Culture, must be greatly congratulated for tackling this huge subject not in five different books but in one miniature tome of some 250 pages, which contain the best in-depth account of racism I have ever read.

Written by a white Australian medical doctor, this excellent book sets out to prove (and in my opinion, extremely successfully) that contrary to received wisdom, there is but one human race.

In the process of doing this, Dr Wieland demolishes Darwinian Evolutionism--the idea that we humans began as a one cell organism a very great while ago, and progressed through multiple cell organisms, to invertebrates, then to vertebrates by a process called natural selection and then, sharing on the way a common ancestor with the chimpanzee, we became separated some 8 million years ago into human stock and through development at different rates, several different races emerged.

Not so, says Carl Wieland. This is simply not true. Charles Darwin and his apostles have got it all wrong, because the universe with all that is in it, including ourselves, cannot be explained without God. An atheist could never write a book like this one, so that is all the more reason why atheists in particular need to read it over and over again to learn from it. Do not abandon the book half way through merely because Carl Wieland, a medical graduate, mentions God in discussion. Whatever your religious or non-religious outlook, please finish the book, jotting down what you disagree with, because on almost every page the author gives scientific and other references that answer most questions that arise in the mind of the serious reader.

The book includes details that will surprise, if not amaze, most readers. Take for example the following 10 statements:

1. The Aboriginal inhabitants of Tasmania were regarded as "wild beasts whom it is lawful to exterminate".

2. The Aborigines were virtually wiped out by European settlers; "the last full blooded Tasmanian died in the 1870s".

3. Thomas Huxley, a prominent English biologist who advocated Darwin's views, wrote in 1871 that "No rational man, cognisant of the facts, believes that the average negro is the equal, still less the superior, of the white man."

4. A museum in Sydney "published a booklet which appeared to include our Aboriginal relatives under the designation of Australian animals'."

5. A New South Wales missionary in Australia "was a horrified witness of the slaughter".

6. Margaret Sanger of Planned Parenthood fame "even addressed a meeting of the Ku Klux Klan and she maintained that the brains of Australian Aborigines were only one step more evolved than chimpanzees and just under blacks, Jews, and Italians".

7. 60,000 blacks were sterilised in the USA.

8. In 1906, a man called Ota Benga, "a dignified human being from Central Africa's Congo [of the ethnic group whose members are often called the pigmies] was put on display in New York's Bronx zoo. There he shared a cage with an orangutan and a parrot, to be ogled by the masses as an example of a living 'ape-man' or 'the missing link'. Large crowds thronged to see this 'primitive creature', justifying the commercial instinct of the promoters."

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9. A Scientific American article at the time referred to pygmies as "ape-like little black people" and said that "even today, ape-like negroes are found in the gloomy forests, who are doubtless direct descendants of these early types of man, who probably closely resembled their simian ancestors." ("Simian" means monkey).

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10. "Virtually no Christian voice in Australia did what was required--to affirm boldly the real history of man as given in the Bible".

In tandem with horrendous facts like these, Dr Carl Wieland points out that Darwin's Theory of Evolution leads inexorably to the notion that the black person is inherently inferior. …

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Charles Darwin and His Apostles Have Go It All Wrong! Professor Felix I D Konotey-Ahulu (Pictured below) Uses This Review of Dr Carl Wieland's New Book, One Human Family-The Bible, Science, Race, and Culture, to Elaborate His Own Position on Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution, Racism and Science
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