Re-Election Trumps Phony Green Hype

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Re-Election Trumps Phony Green Hype


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

REDEYE, Va. -- President Obama wants to kill you. First came the death panels, unchecked socialism and czarists run amok. Now Mr. Obama has decided to kill as many as 12,000 Americans. In addition, he aims to give heart attacks to another 5,300, send 20,000 more to hospitals and emergency rooms and sicken another 2.5 million so they miss school or work.

An exaggeration, you think? Vile blather from evil right-wing talk radio? Crazy vitriol from those racist tea partyers?

Nope. These figures and this scientific analysis come directly from none other than the Obama administration itself.

According to a painstaking analysis last year by Mr. Obama's Environmental Protection Agency based on more than 1,700 scientific studies, dramatic new air-quality guidelines are needed to lower ground-level smog from the current 0.075 parts per million to as low as 0.060 ppm.

That, according to the EPA's study, would save the lives of as many as 12,000 Americans.

Dubbed a regulatory train wreck, the new rules would have caused a wave of coal-fired power plants - still our country's largest power source - to shut down. But Mr. Obama and his EPA insisted in dire warnings that the drastic new steps had to be taken to save lives.

Then, late last week, in a stunning turnabout, the president quietly announced his decision to junk the new ozone standards - sentencing, according to the administration's own calculus, 12,000 Americans to die.

It is not surprising that Mr. Obama's reversal on the desire to save lives was buried on a sleepy Friday before a holiday weekend. Then he quickly scurried out of town for another vacation.

The bombshell announcement comes just as Mr. Obama's re-election campaign is searching for its footing. Perhaps the specter of rolling blackouts on top of 9 percent unemployment gave his campaign operatives a wee bit of nausea.

The move shows the deep, mindless desperation of a guy flailing around, terrified of the political situation he's gotten himself into and hopelessly turning dials, wildly shifting levers and frantically punching buttons in hope that something - anything - might halt his political free-fall. …

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