Where They Are Now

Newsweek, September 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Where They Are Now


The Chief of Staff: Andrew Card

It was a whisper that would echo forever: the White House chief of staff leaning over to inform his boss that America was under attack. George W. Bush lingered for several minutes that day, continuing to read The Pet Goat with a group of elementary-school students. "I thought he reacted exactly the right way. He did nothing to introduce fear to the kids. He did nothing to demonstrate fear to the media that would translate into the satisfaction of the terrorists around the world," Andrew Card says now.

Card's life was changed as well. Partly because of the photo, he became a reluctant public face of a war on terror that sparked a decade of political strife. After leaving the White House five years later, he says, "I went dark, and recuperated and rejuvenated." Card hit the speaking circuit, then entered the corporate world, sitting on the boards of Union Pacific and Lorillard. Now 64, he has reaffiliated with the Bush clan, as acting dean of the George H.W. Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M. "I am committed to making sure people don't forget the day."

The Widow: Mary Duff

Surrounded by unfolding narratives of heartbreak, Mary Duff, as an angelic-looking 33-year-old widow, became a symbol of grief on the front pages of newspapers around the world. Duff's husband, Peter Ortale, was working as a bond broker for Euro Brokers on the 84th floor of the South Tower when it was struck by United Flight 175. Four days after he never came home, Mary picked up a photo of Peter, and with her mother, Kathi Adlum, formed a search party of two. Their efforts turned up nothing, but for weeks, Duff held out hope. "And then," she says now, "I more or less went to bed for two years."

Duff's recovery has been slow. She had a daughter, Kate, now 5, with a longtime friend-"a very modern family," she calls it. She's in therapy and sometimes wonders why she still lives in New York. "Then again," she jokes, "where else can I live that delivers 24/7?" On Sept. 9, she'll venture her closest to Ground Zero in 10 years to host a benefit in Ortale's name. And on the 11th? "I'll light a candle like I always do, and I'll have my hour of crying, and then I'll ask Kate to go to the park."

The Firefighter: Bob Beckwith

Bob Beckwith put his retirement on unexpected hiatus when, three days after the attacks, he left his home on Long Island, talked his way past three police and National Guard barricades, and managed to reach the smoldering Ground Zero. The former firefighter, then 69, found himself on a bucket brigade, hauling away debris. Then came word that President George W. Bush was on site. A man he later learned was Karl Rove asked Beckwith to test the strength of a pile of rubble for "somebody important." When the president arrived, Beckwith helped him up. "Where you going?" Beckwith remembers Bush asking when he tried to walk away. "No, you stay right here." With one arm around the ash-smeared man, Bush rallied the first responders by bullhorn. "That was uplifting for us," Beckwith says now. "I said, 'Whoa, boy. I can't wait to get back to work.'"

It turned out to be the first of almost a dozen meetings with the president, including one memorable visit to the White House with former governor George Pataki and former mayor Rudy Giuliani. Beckwith, who remains on Long Island and now has 10 grandchildren, all of whom live close by, still exchanges Christmas cards with the former president. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where They Are Now
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.