Schools Have Rich History of Contributing to City's Health

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 7, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Schools Have Rich History of Contributing to City's Health


How does one value public education in terms of its role in the lifeblood of a city like Geneva?

Is it based upon the visible history of school buildings come and gone? If so, then surely Geneva Community Unit School District 304 has made a contribution. Beginning with its first two public schools, West Side School (now the site of U.S. Post Office) and East Side School (now the site of Malone's Funeral Home) both built in the 1850s, and from Fourth Street School (now the school district offices) built in 1916, to Coultrap (originally serving as our high school then our junior high then our middle school and then as an elementary school) constructed in 1923, to Sixth Street School (now housing county offices) opened in 1925, and beyond, Geneva's historical growth and rejuvenation have been accompanied and complemented by the construction and adaptation of our various school buildings.

Or is public education's value measured in terms of the recognitions and awards bestowed? If so, then our schools surely add to Geneva's enduring attractiveness and standard of livability. A recent Chicago newspaper article reviewed schools throughout Kane County based upon various criteria, rating Geneva schools as the first seven in the top 10, and six of our schools earned the 2010 State Board of Education Academic Excellence Award. Geneva Community Unit School District 304 was awarded a 2010 Bright A+ Award, and a 2011 Bright Red Apple Award. Geneva students continue to bring home conference, regional and statewide awards in music, athletics, the arts, and of course academics, including students being recognized by the National Merit Scholarship program, as well as over 100 being named as Illinois State Scholars.

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