Demands to Classify Films by Levels of Smoking as Well as Violence and Sex

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 20, 2011 | Go to article overview

Demands to Classify Films by Levels of Smoking as Well as Violence and Sex


Byline: MADELEINE BRINDLEY

MOVIES which include characters smoking should be automatically rated 18, leading tobacco experts said today.

The call comes as worrying new evidence reveals how teenagers are influenced by images of actors smoking in Hollywood films.

The experts and researchers said smoking in films remains a "major and persistent driver" of smoking uptake among children and young people.

And they said the responsible parties - including film makers, regulators, and politicians - are "abjectly failing to control" the portrayal of smoking in films.

It has also been suggested that anti-smoking adverts should be screened before films which depict the habit.

But the British Board of Film Classification has told the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies that any change to the classification system "would be likely to provoke powerful opposition from the film industry".

Research published today in the journal Thorax shows teenagers exposed to images of smoking on the large screen are more likely to smoke.

The study, by Bristol University, found the more films they saw containing depictions of smoking, the more likely they were to have tried smoking themselves.

Those exposed to movie content with the most depictions of smoking are 59% more likely to have started smoking than those exposed to the least, after taking account of other influential social and family factors.

Dr Andrea Waylen, who led the study, said: "More than half the films shown in the UK that contain smoking are rated 15 or below, so children and young teenagers are clearly exposed.

"Our results confirm an association between this exposure and youth smoking in this country, indicating that raising the certification to 18 in the UK is likely to lower smoking rates among youth.

"Given that smoking depictions in films are not consistent with the ban on smoking in public places in the UK and that the relationship may be causal, a precautionary principle should be pursued.

"Films ought to be rated by exposure to smoking in the same way that they are currently rated by levels of violence."

An editorial, also published in Thorax, by Dr Ailsa Lyons and Professor John Britton, from the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, said: "Protecting children from an exposure so potentially damaging is a national governmental responsibility and the solution to the problem is simple - for the UK and indeed other film classification agencies to apply a default 18 classification on all films containing smoking. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Demands to Classify Films by Levels of Smoking as Well as Violence and Sex
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.