Plane's History Sought

The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia), September 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Plane's History Sought


MY FAMILY is doing research on an aeroplane that crashed into the sea, just off Mackay, on March 14, 1954.

Our father, Joe Refalo, was able to purchase the front of this plane and very cleverly turned it into a caravan, in which our family holidayed at Seaforth beach.

We know Dad collected this part of the plane from a holding depot for planes from farm land at Walkerston. Our brother, Mick, remembers bringing it home on the back of a truck.

We are asking if anyone remembers this plane/caravan at Seaforth and, if possible, do they have any photos that we may be able to borrow.

MARGARET BORG, Habana

Writer's reasoning simply Cyridiculous'

I REALLY wonder sometimes whether it is worth my time responding to letters such as the recent contribution by Philip Harris (DM 20/09/11).

His implied suggestion that the High Court and the Government should come together in the national interest to solve the immigration problem involves such a fundamental misconception of the separation of powers and independence of the judiciary as to require no further comment.

Likewise, the suggestion that the Government has signed too many UN agreements, thereby tying the nation's hands and compromising the national interest, is self-evidently ridiculous, unless it is accepted that Australia should no longer adhere to internationally accepted humanitarian standards.

Then again, maybe there are others like Mr Harris who think Australia should become a third-rate nation, which eschews human rights and in which judges are in the pocket of the executive.

If people like this ever get into a majority in this country I will be seeking asylum... maybe in Malaysia.

NEIL FRANCEY, Mackay

Argument one of science, not politics

HAVING found a site on the web that agrees with him, Ian Christensen (DM 15/09/11) proceeds to label the vast body of science throughout the world, the United Nations, CSIRO and all the great universities as C[pounds sterling]gulliblesC[yen] because they fail to agree with his view.

Mr Christensen falls into the error so many are prone to by attempting to make the issue not one of science, but of politics: the Greens and left wingers, he would have us believe, are creating the debate. A neat bit of smoke and mirrors technique that because, if it is simply about politics, it is just a matter of opinion, not scientific fact.

What he, and so many like him forget is that if he could wave a magic wand and make all the Green and left wing politicians disappear there would still be planet warming. …

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