Standoff Threatens Autism Research Funding; GOP Senators Object to Limits

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Standoff Threatens Autism Research Funding; GOP Senators Object to Limits


Byline: Jordan E. Otero, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

House lawmakers Wednesday implored their Senate counterparts to break a logjam they said is endangering federal support for autism research and funding.

The Combating Autism Reauthorization Act passed the House of Representatives by voice vote Tuesday but is facing opposition from conservative Senate Republicans who argue that Congress should not be dictating to researchers on the front lines how best to spend scarce federal dollars.

No one who is opposing reauthorization of this bill right now is opposed to autism research or the ideas behind it, said Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, one of four Republicans who objected to the bill when it reached the Senate on Tuesday.

What we are opposed to is tying the hands of the researchers and the directors at National Institutes of Health and telling them what they should do and how they should do it.

House lawmakers and outside advocates for autism funding held a news conference at the Capitol on Wednesday afternoon to urge a compromise.

Our work is done in the House, said Rep. Michael F. Doyle, Pennsylvania Democrat and a co-sponsor of the autism authorization bill. We ask our colleagues in the Senate: If there's a reason that you have a hold on this bill, let's discuss those reasons. Let's sit down and work them out.

Rep. Christopher H. Smith, New Jersey Republican, wrote the Combating Autism Act of 2006 after discovering disturbing trends and limited amounts of quantified research on autism in the mid-1990s. He said that even after 10 years of extraordinary work that the issue has not been won. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Standoff Threatens Autism Research Funding; GOP Senators Object to Limits
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.