Sunstein's Dull Red-Tape Shears; Czar's Regulatory Pullback Allows Too Much New Regulation

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

Sunstein's Dull Red-Tape Shears; Czar's Regulatory Pullback Allows Too Much New Regulation


Byline: Rep. Cliff Stearns, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Cass Sunstein, administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), recently outlined how he and others in the White House Office of Management and Budget were eliminating bureaucratic red tape in the executive branch agencies. In fact, while the rollout of the White House's widely touted regulatory reform initiative may have started with a bang, it has followed with a whimper. In contrast to the fanfare surrounding issuance of Executive Order 13563, or his May 26 announcement of the preliminary results of a government-wide review of the current morass of federal regulations, Mr. Sunstein's Aug. 23 release of final agency plans to scale back regulations was, for the most part, a non-event.

Rather, the Obama administration's latest announcement is sadly nothing more than a Band-Aid to treat our nation's severed economic artery at a time when investment has all but evaporated and jobs are scarce. From industrial giants to small business start-ups, our nation's job creators are sitting on trillions of dollars in capital because they are concerned with the countless regulations created by the Obama administration, all of which are adding uncertainty to the oppressive regulatory environment.

Mr. Sunstein has appeared twice before the subcommittee I lead within the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. At a Jan. 26 hearing, I took issue with the amorphous standard for regulatory review set out in Executive Order 13563 and specifically, that where appropriate and permitted by law, each agency may consider (and discuss qualitatively) values that are difficult or impossible to quantify, including equity, human dignity, fairness and distributive impacts. I was concerned then and continue to be until this day that reliance on such imprecise criteria may subvert any serious attempt at cost-benefit analysis.

At this and a subsequent hearing, on June 3, my colleagues and I also shared with Mr. Sunstein our concern that the president's gestures toward regulatory relief are likely to ring hollow, especially as some agencies such as the Department of Health and Human Services, punt most of their relief savings down the road. While some very outdated rules might be cut back or eliminated, the Obama administration is doing nothing to slow the ongoing regulatory juggernaut of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) nor address the thousands of pages of bureaucratic burdens released so far to implement a massive takeover of health care and the controversial financial reform bill. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sunstein's Dull Red-Tape Shears; Czar's Regulatory Pullback Allows Too Much New Regulation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.