Preserving History: Newspapers Benefit from Digitalizing Archives

Editor & Publisher, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Preserving History: Newspapers Benefit from Digitalizing Archives


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AS PRINT MAKES way for digital, more newspapers are searching for ways to preserve their photo archives. Rogers Photo Archives not only provides a solution for digitalizing photos, it also helps papers create revenue.

For The Detroit News, which had nearly 800,000 prints dating from the late 1800s to the 1980s stored in drawers, Rogers Photo Archives was just want they needed.

"We used to go up to the fourth-floor library, search through the alphabetized files, find the photo, scan it, and then input the caption," said Bob Houlihan, director of photography. "It wasn't easy. It involved a lot of sneezing from the dust."

Based in Little Rock, Ark., Rogers Photo Archives is the largest privately owned collection of photographic images. Owner John Rogers' interest in vintage sports photography branched off into the photo archives of daily newspapers in 2008.

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Rogers' services include photograph transportation; photo restoration, including removal of editing marks; scanning; creating a digitized database by applying metadata such as dates, titles, descriptions, captions, photographers, and news service; and a hard drive complete with all images.

Now with just a few keystrokes, Houlihan is able to find a photo without a single sneeze. …

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Preserving History: Newspapers Benefit from Digitalizing Archives
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