Battle against American Terrorists in Yemen Isn't over; We've Killed Three, but Thousands Hold American Passports

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 4, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Battle against American Terrorists in Yemen Isn't over; We've Killed Three, but Thousands Hold American Passports


Byline: Carrie Giardino, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Yemen is a sanctuary for al Qaeda terrorists that is barreling into civil war and instability. Add into this the fact that tens of thousands of Yemenis hold U.S. passports, and Yemen emerges as the perfect habitat for a new al Qaeda threat: the American terrorist.

Three high-profile terrorists with U.S. citizenship have been killed in Yemen. Kamal Derwish, also known as Ahmed Hijazi, was killed in Yemen in 2002 while traveling with other al Qaeda operatives, including the organizer of the USS Cole attack. Derwish was the reported leader of the Lackawanna Six, the group of Yemeni-Americans from New York who traveled to Afghanistan in early 2001 to attend al Qaeda training camps.

The second two were killed Friday in the same U.S. airstrike. One was Anwar al-Awlaki, the American-born cleric known for his savvy use of the Internet for recruitment. He was linked to Malik Nidal Hasan, the American Army psychiatrist charged with carrying out the worst shooting spree ever on an American military base, and was known to have encouraged the Nigerian Underwear Bomber, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, to try to blow up a Detroit-bound plane on Christmas Day in 2009.

The other U.S.-passport-holding terrorist killed in Friday's airstrike was Samir Khan, a Saudi-born Pakistani raised in Queens, N.Y. He lived in North Carolina until moving to Yemen to become editor of al Qaeda's propaganda magazine, Inspire.

There are tens of thousands of Yemeni-Americans living in Yemen's capital, Sanaa, who hold American passports. They not only have the right to travel to the United States whenever they choose, but they also have the right to apply for immigrant visas for their supposed family members. The inherent security gaps in this process pose a very real threat. I saw this firsthand while serving as vice consul at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen.

Because Yemen has only been unified since 1990, many of the legally issued documents in that country contain fraudulent information. In order to receive a birth certificate, death certificate or any other national documentation, a Yemeni national simply appears with two of his neighbors, who all attest to the veracity of the information, and a new document is issued.

Documents supplied for visa applications, therefore, may appear legitimate but could provide benefits to people who are not entitled to them. In most cases, this is simply an attempt to escape from the poorest Arab nation. But we should make no mistake that it also could be used by those who want to perpetrate terrorism against the United States.

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