Glory Days Roll on for Coal Tubs; Mining Village History Preserved with Floral Display

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), October 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Glory Days Roll on for Coal Tubs; Mining Village History Preserved with Floral Display


Byline: TOM MULLEN

A PIECE of Tyneside coal-mining history will be preserved for future generations.

These traditional coal tubs were once a common sight at Marley Hill Colliery in Gateshead.

Although the colliery closed almost four decades ago, the tubs were exhibited at Marley Hill Primary School as the basis for a floral display.

But when the school closed amisd an education shake-up last December, the future of the tubs was thrown into doubt. That was until a group of local councillors secured council cash to find a new home for them.

The tubs, newly-restored by volunteers at the Tanfield Railway, were due to be unveiled today at Marley Hill Aged Miners' Homes, where they will once again be filled with flowers.

Coun Jonathan Wallace, who led the project alongside fellow councillors John McClurey and Marilynn Ord, said: "When the school was closed in December, there was general consensus that the coal tubs should be retained as part of the heritage of the village whose mine closed in 1984.

"The tubs had been used as part of a floral display and it was felt that they should be used again in the same way.

Myself, John McClurey and Marilynn Ord arranged for the restoration of the tubs to be part-financed by the Local Community Fund.

"Durham Aged Miners' Housing Association also covered some of the costs and gave permission for the tubs to be placed on their land in front of the Marley Hill Aged Miners' Homes. …

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