Don't Let Big Bank Card Fees Spoil Trip Abroad; BEFORE YOU GO Info and Advice to Get You Ready for Takeoff

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), October 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

Don't Let Big Bank Card Fees Spoil Trip Abroad; BEFORE YOU GO Info and Advice to Get You Ready for Takeoff


AS the OFT calls for an investigation into currency fees, a study by travel search site Skyscanner has revealed that Brits could be paying hundreds in unnecessary ATM charges when using debit and credit cards abroad.

A survey found using credit and debit cards is the most popular method of using currency abroad.

Skyscanner reviewed both credit and debit cards for the top UK banks and found not only was there a huge difference in the charges made between banks, but even customers banking with the same bank could be charged different amounts depending on which card type they use. EXCHANGE RATES Australia: Bangladesh: Canada: Denmark: Euro: 1.1523 Hong Kong: India: 76.2200 Japan: New Zealand: Norway: Pakistan: Saudi Arabia: Singapore: South Africa: Sweden: Switzerland: Turkey: 2.8552 US: 1.5486 Expert Carol Petrie says, "Our study shows the importance of doing your research before you go on holiday. Consumers should check how much their bank charges and look at using a card where there is no interest rate charged on purchases made abroad, no foreign exchange fee and no ATM cost. …

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