Why Freud Can Help You with Depression. ...but Not a Fear of Heights; Do You Need Psychoanalysis or Hypnotherapy? Lie on the Couch - with Our Guide

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), October 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Why Freud Can Help You with Depression. ...but Not a Fear of Heights; Do You Need Psychoanalysis or Hypnotherapy? Lie on the Couch - with Our Guide


Byline: Matthew Barbour

Feel like you might need therapy? You're not alone - about a third of Britons will experience mental health problems every year, and one in ten will be referred to a specialist psychiatric service. Today more than half of GP surgeries provide such help, and there are 300,000 registered psychotherapists in England alone.

The types of therapy on offer vary greatly in their methods, and in what they can achieve. So which one is right for your particular problems? Here, experts reveal the merits and shortcomings of the most popular approaches.

PSYCHOANALYSIS

THE THEORY: One of the first types of psychotherapy, developed by neurologist Sigmund Freud in the late 19th Century. Psychoanalysts believe most mental activity is unconscious and that mental illness is caused by repressed traumatic childhood memories. Patients are encouraged to talk about their dreams, thoughts, memories and feelings. By doing this, they understand their emotional conflicts and find resolution.

GOOD FOR: Depression or anxiety, sexual problems or physical symptoms without an obvious underlying cause. 'This can benefit those who are plagued by compulsions or feelings of isolation and loneliness,' says Phillip Hodson, a Fellow of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

WHO MIGHT NOT BENEFIT: Schizophrenics, those suffering from psychosis or phobias. 'If the client is paranoid, delving deep with psychoanalysis can stir up negative emotions. It might give you a greater understanding of your life, but analysis won't necessarily bring about change, such as overcoming a fear of heights, as you're not actively encouraged to alter your behaviour.'

COST PRIVATELY: [pounds sterling]35 to [pounds sterling]60 a session.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.psychoanalysis.org.uk

NEURO-LINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (NLP)

THE THEORY: Patients are told to focus on what they want to achieve, and discuss how they might go about it. If the problem involves others, role play is encouraged.

GOOD FOR: Those wanting more direction in their lives, relationship conflicts or with self-esteem problems. Professor Tony Roth, joint course director in clinical psychology at University College London, says: 'Advocates say NLP can enhance relationships and help develop self-management skills.'

WHO MIGHT NOT BENEFIT: Those with clinical depression, serious emotional problems or phobias. 'No clinical trials have found it is effective treatment for severe mental health problems,' Prof Roth says.

COST PRIVATELY: [pounds sterling]40 to [pounds sterling]100 a session.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.anlp.org

COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY (CBT)

THE THEORY: The therapist asks the patient what they want to achieve, then sets goals and gives clear guidelines on how to make the changes desired. Patients are given breathing exercises and phrases to repeat so they can replace thoughts, emotions, or physical feelings they don't want to have with ones that they do.

GOOD FOR: Phobias, anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive disorders and eating disorders.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Freud Can Help You with Depression. ...but Not a Fear of Heights; Do You Need Psychoanalysis or Hypnotherapy? Lie on the Couch - with Our Guide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.