The Little Big Book Club

By Williams, Leanne; Lawson, Sarah | Practically Primary, October 2011 | Go to article overview

The Little Big Book Club


Williams, Leanne, Lawson, Sarah, Practically Primary


The Big Book Club Inc is a not for profit organisation that is dedicated to the promotion of reading. TBBC Inc. has two projects: The Big Book Club for adults and The Little Big Club (LBBC) for parents and carers of children aged between birth and five years of age and the early childhood sector.

The Little Big Book Club's primary goal is to promote the love of and the importance of reading from a very early age. Through a variety of programs and resources LBBC supports both parents and professionals in providing children with a crucial base for lifelong literacy, success in formal schooling and improved life chances.

Literacy in the Early Years

It's Story Time Program

Each month The Little Big Book Club selects and recommends three books to read with children. This ongoing project helps to inform parents and early childhood professionals of appropriate and high quality books to read with children at different ages and stages.

The selections are supported by our Learning Time and Activity Time programs which are available free from our website. These resources provide those that work and interact with children a starting point for developing language and emergent literacy skills through play based experiences. The suggestions are based on the outcomes of The Early Years Framework--Belonging, Being and Becoming and aim to develop literacy in the Early Years.

Literacy in the Early Years

"Literacy is the capacity, confidence and disposition to use language in all its forms." Belonging, Being and Becoming, 2009

Literacy is a complex skill. It encompasses many of the skills we need to function in everyday life and is one of the most important foundations for success at school. In Early Childhood settings the focus is on pre-literacy skills or emergent literacy.

Emergent literacy consists of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that are developmental precursors to reading and writing. (Whitehurst & Lonigan 1998). Some of the key factors that assist the transition from pre-literacy to literacy skills have been identified in the emergent literacy framework as:

* Language ability

* Letter identification/knowledge

* Phonological awareness

* Conventions of print

* Literacy-promoting environments

Whereas previously literacy has been seen as a skill to be taught at school, current research emphasizes the need to foster pre-literacy or emergent literacy skills in children from birth to ive years.

Literacy in the Curriculum

As stated in Belonging, Being Becoming: the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia: "Literacy and numeracy capabilities are important aspects of communication and are vital for successful learning across the curriculum" (2009, p. 38).

The National Curriculum: English is organised around the three strands of Language, Literature and Literacy, with Literacy deined as students applying their English skills and knowledge to read, view, speak, listen to, write and create a growing repertoire of texts.

Literacy rich experiences

Young children learn best when actively engaged. Literacy rich experiences such as music, movement, dance, speaking, listening, storytelling and song provide children with opportunity to express literacy ideas and practice their emerging skills in an interesting and meaningful way.

The Early Years Learning Framework (2009) Outcome 5 states that children are effective communicators.

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