Integrating Technology and Engineering with a Marine Design Contest and 3-D Modeling: A Significant Highlight of the Competitive Event Is That It Provides a "Real-World" Engineering Design Activity That Is Free and Open to All Area High Schools

By Hammons, John | Technology and Engineering Teacher, October 2011 | Go to article overview

Integrating Technology and Engineering with a Marine Design Contest and 3-D Modeling: A Significant Highlight of the Competitive Event Is That It Provides a "Real-World" Engineering Design Activity That Is Free and Open to All Area High Schools


Hammons, John, Technology and Engineering Teacher


Boat Design Competition

The Northrop Grumman (now Huntington Ingalls Industries, Incorporated) Apprentice School, in cooperation with several area businesses, sponsors an annual boat-design competition for high school students to increase awareness of the naval architecture profession and the shipbuilding industry.

The competition engages students' math, science, technology and creative abilities and introduces them to engineering concepts, drafting, project planning, and leadership principles. The parameters of the competition challenge students to design a fast and maneuverable boat that will carry three different payloads such as golf balls, sandbags, and crates. The hull must be made from two sheets of 1/8" steel plate measuring 5 by 10 feet. The last constraint is that a 6-inch freeboard, which is the distance between the waterline and deck edge of a boat, must be maintained. During the first stage of the competition, students have to complete and submit a design package consisting of the following items:

* Design history notebook

* Completed calculations spreadsheet

* Design drawings such as manufacturing drawings and loading diagrams

* A nesting plan

In the second stage, all of the design packages are independently judged, the top four designs are selected, and their boats are actually built by Newport News Shipbuilding apprentices. Each of the four top teams compete in "sea trials" on Lake Maury at the Mariner's Museum in Newport News, VA to determine the winning design entry. Sea trials are comprehensive performance tests that are conducted by the shipyards at sea after the completion of a ship's construction and before releasing the vessel to a client or Department of the Navy. A significant highlight of the competitive event is that it provides a "real-world" engineering design activity that is free and open to all area high schools. Since the competition is underwritten by the Northrop Grumman Apprentice School and several area businesses, there are no costs or entry fees to school divisions, teachers, or competing teams.

During the 2010 Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) Boat Design competition there were fifty teams consisting of 287 students from across the Commonwealth of Virginia and two teams that entered the competition from other states. Of the 50 teams that entered the competitive event, only 23 submitted completed design packages and were considered for the construction stage of the competition. While half of the entries did not make it to the full competition, this did not mean that their effort went unrewarded but rather reflects that intense competition and rigorous application of math, science, and engineering skills are required by each of the teams to design a boat. It also demonstrated that some teams had difficulty in finishing their designs. Northrop Grumman, the contest sponsor, took the opportunity to carefully review the top competitors' design packages to identify knowledge, skills, and strategies common to the top teams to share with future teams to raise the competitive bar and broaden the field of successful contestants.

As a technology and engineering design teacher at York High School in Yorktown, VA, I introduced my classes to the SNAME Student Boat Building contest. Accordingly, the students were enthusiastic about the idea of participating in the contest and applying skills they were learning in our 3-D modeling and engineering design classes. As our team's sponsor, I assisted and guided each of the teams competing at the highest level of the 2010 boat competition. Of the 23 designs that were considered for the construction stage, four came from York High School, and all of these four ranked in the top eight. And out of these four, two were named finalists, and one won the championship trophy on April 17th, 2010.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

This year was the fourth that York High School had teams participating in the Boat Design contest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrating Technology and Engineering with a Marine Design Contest and 3-D Modeling: A Significant Highlight of the Competitive Event Is That It Provides a "Real-World" Engineering Design Activity That Is Free and Open to All Area High Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.