Counseling Stereotype Is No Longer Accurate

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

Counseling Stereotype Is No Longer Accurate


You are lying on a leather couch in a dark, wood-paneled office with deep pile carpeting and wall-to-wall books.

A balding, middle-aged man with a neatly trimmed beard, a well-tailored gray suit, bifocals and a thick German accent sits behind a massive desk. Your conversation seems to wander; you talk about childhood memories, troublesome dreams and vague feelings.

He takes copious notes on everything you say, occasionally interrupting you to ask a question such as "When did you stop hating you mother?" Or to mutter a weighty "I see a" This has been going on once a week for six years, and it is costing you an arm and a leg.

This is the picture of counseling (or psychotherapy) that has been around for a good 75 years. And let's face it: If that's what it's all about, who really needs it? But before we just write counseling off, let me paint a little different picture for you.

You sit in a bright, pleasant room, probably with other members of your family. Your counselor, a younger woman, sits with you. You discuss problems you're having right now. The therapist tries to help each person really hear and be heard. She clarifies, interprets and suggests, always working to make sure everybody gets a chance to tell their story.

Sometimes she even gives you "homework," things to try between counseling sessions. You've agreed to a contract for a limited number of sessions; you're regularly evaluating what you've accomplished and what you've got left to work on. Sound a little better?

Well, these days, chances are the second picture is far more accurate than the first. Counseling, or psychotherapy, has changed a lot in the last half-century -- it's been along time since I've even seen a leather couch.

Modern psychotherapy still considers our childhood experiences, dreams and feelings to be very important. Most therapists, however, realize that the here-and-now also is important. Understanding how we live today, especially how we relate to other people, often is key to unraveling our problems.

So we spend time exploring our relationships with friends, family, etc. We talk about talking -- for example, how to tell others who we are and what we want. And we figure out ways to change our behavior so we can start to live the life we want to live.

Let me give you an example. Mary and Frank were a married couple in their early 30s. Frank had moved out after six years of marriage, complaining that he just couldn't take Mary's nagging anymore. Mary came to me. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Counseling Stereotype Is No Longer Accurate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.