Sorry, but Chivalry Isn't Dead, Says Emily Maitlis

Daily Mail (London), November 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Sorry, but Chivalry Isn't Dead, Says Emily Maitlis


Byline: Sarah Hajibagheri

IT may seem a somewhat surprising view for a woman who regularly spars with boorish male politicians on Newsnight.

But presenter Emily Maitlis has come to the defence of men by declaring that chivalry is not dead.

The 41-year-old mother of two has spoken out following claims by actress Michelle Dockery - who plays Lady Mary Crawley in ITV1's period drama Downton Abbey - that good manners have disappeared over the decades.

Miss Maitlis said: 'If you ask me if I mourn a chivalry I never knew - of bows and curtseys and promenades around a Downton drawing room - then no.

'But I don't think chivalry is remotely dead. I'd say - and perhaps Woody Allen would join me - look past the nostalgia: we never had it so good.' Miss Maitlis added: 'I think we do live in a chivalrous age but one updated for our time.' The presenter wrote her passionate defence of chivalry for the Radio Times. In it, she argues the concept has evolved for a modern age.

'How quick we are to assume there was always a golden age before us,' she wrote.

'Where the art was purer, the culture was richer and the manners were perfect. I apply the point to our notions of chivalry. The knights on horses are gone, but - as a techno disaster-case - I'm constantly impressed by how much time my colleagues will give me to sort out a computer glitch or a misdirected printer.' The broadcaster refers to the most often quoted example of chivalrous behaviour - men opening doors for women. …

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Sorry, but Chivalry Isn't Dead, Says Emily Maitlis
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