The Greatest Political Rivalries

By Graham, David A. | Newsweek, November 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Greatest Political Rivalries


Graham, David A., Newsweek


Byline: David A. Graham

With the Republican presidential contest growing testier by the day, here's a look at the most quarrelsome relationships in politics.

MITT ROMNEY VS. RICK PERRY

Forget Ronald Reagan's famous commandment against GOP family feuds. The disagreement between these two has been more than political since the pair fought over whether the Boy Scouts could be included in the Olympic Games run by Romney in 2002. When Romney grabbed Perry's arm during a debate shouting match in October, he guaranteed there would be no quick detente.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH VS. RONALD REAGAN

Although the sunny Gipper and stiff Bush joined forces as an odd couple in 1980, Bush derided Reagan's supply-side platform as "voodoo economics." Reagan repaid Bush's snipe by abstaining from endorsing him in the 1988 Republican primary.

TED KENNEDY VS. JIMMY CARTER

In 1980 the beleaguered Carter faced an unprecedented challenge from his fellow Democrat. Though he held Kennedy off, the president lost the election--and his cool. Even after Kennedy's death, the low-key Georgian has kept criticizing the senator.

DICK CHENEY VS. CONDOLEEZZA RICE

After their years together in the West Wing, the headstrong veep alleged in his memoir this year that Rice had "tearfully" apologized for suggesting President Bush say "sorry" for intelligence failures. …

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