Female Sexual Pain Disorders and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

By LoFrisco, Barbara M. | The Journal of Sex Research, November-December 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Female Sexual Pain Disorders and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy


LoFrisco, Barbara M., The Journal of Sex Research


Female sexual pain disorders are important to study because they can negatively affect both a woman's well-being and her romantic relationships. Despite the consequences of the disorders, there is a dearth of research on the topic. Of what is available, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions appear to be the most frequently studied, possibly because CBT addresses the psychological elements of pain. The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for the use of CBT, provide a critical analysis of these research studies by evaluating each study in detail, and identify gaps in the research base.

Sexual pain disorders are defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev. [DSM-IV-TR]; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000) as either dyspareunia or vaginismus. Dyspareunia is defined by the DSM-IV-TR as "(A) Recurrent or persistent genital pain associated with sexual intercourse in either a male or a female; (B) The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty; (C) The disturbance is not caused exclusively by Vaginismus or lack of lubrication, is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction), and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition" (p. 556). Vulvodynia, pain in the vulva, and its subtype, provoked vestibulodynia (also referred to as vulvar vestibulitis), pain in the vulvar vestibule area, are both types of dyspareunia. Although the definition of dyspareunia includes males, this article only addresses research with females.

Vaginismus is defined by the DSM-IV-TR as "(A) Recurrent or persistent involuntary spasm of the musculature of the outer third of the vagina that interferes with sexual intercourse; (B) The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty; (C) The disturbance is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (e.g., Somatization Disorder) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition" (APA, 2000, p. 558).

Although they are separately defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; APA, 1994), because many researchers think that vaginismus and dyspareunia are related and because they contain many of the same features, they are discussed as one condition. Specifically, the involuntary contracture of the pelvic floor, the distinguishing feature of vaginismus, could be a reaction to a pain condition (Backman, Widenbrant, Bohm-Starke, & Dahlof, 2008) and may also play a role in maintaining the pain (Bergeron & Lord, 2003). Thus, vaginismus can be a reaction to dyspareunia and can interfere with the treatment of dyspareunia. In fact, Bergeron and Lord (2003) reported that they are so closely related they really mean the same thing.

Importance and Prevalence

Female sexual pain disorders are both important for women's well-being and prevalent. Researchers have found that sexual satisfaction can have a significant, positive effect on women's overall happiness (Blanchflower & Oswald, 2004; Kahneman, Krueger, Schkade, Schwarz, & Stone, 2004; Laumann et al., 2006). Sexual frequency can also have a significant, positive effect on happiness (Blanchflower & Oswald, 2004). Thus, it follows that a reduction in sexual satisfaction may lead to a reduction in overall well-being and general happiness (Laumann et al., 2006). In addition, Kahneman et al. (2004) found that out of the common activities that women perform, sex was rated as providing the most pleasure. Because female sexual pain disorders can prevent or reduce frequency of sexual activity or negatively impact satisfaction, they can have a deleterious effect on women's overall happiness and well-being.

Dyspareunia appears to be prevalent, although estimates vary according to study.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Female Sexual Pain Disorders and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?