Was Shakespeare a Fraud? to Be or Not to Be Noble 'Scribbler': That's the Question of 'Anonymous'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Was Shakespeare a Fraud? to Be or Not to Be Noble 'Scribbler': That's the Question of 'Anonymous'


Byline: Roland Flamini, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

At the start of Anonymous, actor Derek Jacobi asks the audience, What if I told you Shakespeare never wrote a single word?

That, in fact, is the premise of director Roland Emmerich's film, which opened Friday. It portrays William Shakespeare as a barely literate actor who falsely claims credit for the more than 30 plays, to say nothing of the 154 sonnets - all in reality written by Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

In the film, the earl wished it that way. In my world, one does not write plays; people like you do, he tells Shakespeare. Translation: It's below the dignity of a nobleman to be known as a scribbler. But in Anonymous, the earl is a compulsive playwright. Voices in his head tell him to write the immortal tragedies, histories and comedies that most people associate with the Bard of Avon.

The real authorship of Shakespeare's plays has been in dispute for years, largely because of the scant evidence linking the actor from Stratford-on-Avon to his enduring body of work. Columbia University Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro, author of Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? says Samuel Moshein Schmucker, an American Lutheran pastor, inadvertently launched the controversy in the mid-1800s.

In refuting historic doubts regarding the existence of Christ, Schmucker suggested - rhetorically - that the same doubts could be raised about the non-controversial existence of Shakespeare, and then listed some of the questions. Analysts have been debating them ever since.

But if Anonymous has a patron saint, it's Thomas Looney, an English schoolteacher who in 1930 first championed Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, as the author of Shakespeare's plays.

Anonymous also advances other historically dubious claims, such as that de Vere was both the illegitimate son of Queen Elizabeth I and, subsequently, her lover. Their son together was the Earl of Southampton, to whom Shakespeare's sonnets are dedicated. In the movie, of course, that dedication is explained as a father's affection for his son.

By bringing this unsubstantiated version of history to the screen, a lot of facts - theatrical and historical - are trampled, Mr. Shapiro wrote recently in the New York Times.

If the film gives so-called Oxfordians a boost, de Vere is still only one of many candidates put forward as the real claimant to Shakespeare's genius, including the Elizabethan philosopher Francis Bacon, and even two women.

A movement called the Shakespeare Authorship Trust declares on its website that it was founded because there is room for reasonable doubt about the identity of William Shakespeare and what he stands for.

An online trust manifesto listing the arguments against Shakespearean authorship is signed by more than 2,000 supporters, including former Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and John Paul Stevens.

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Was Shakespeare a Fraud? to Be or Not to Be Noble 'Scribbler': That's the Question of 'Anonymous'
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