Smaller Devices Mult Iply Sales

Marketing, November 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Smaller Devices Mult Iply Sales


The consumer computer market is in robust health, with 40% of homes owning two or more tablets, lap tops or desktop machines, writes Jane Bainbridge.

Although the consumer computer sector is inevitably fast-changing, the arrival of the tablet with the launch of Apple's iPad in April 2010 was still one of the biggest innovations to hit the market in decades.

The old discussions about features were suddenly obsolete as Apple introduced a computer that was more mobile phone and media centre than PC, with a coffee table kudos that was unprecedented in this market.

Others have followed Apple's lead. By the end of the year, Mintel predicts that tablet sales will reach pounds 450m. While desktops once dominated the computer market, over the years consumers have opted for more portable machines, such as laptops and netbooks.

Between 2006 and 2010, laptop volume sales doubled, boosted by cheaper prices. The total UK consumer market for desktop machines will reach pounds 632m and laptops pounds 2.4bn by the end of 2011, according to Mintel.

Tablet computers are likely to cannibalise desktop and laptop sales, although analyst predictions vary as to the degree; forecasts range from 10% to 50% cannibalisation in the next three years.

However, for people creating longer text documents, the lack of a 'proper' keyboard on tablets is a drawback. They are geared more toward content consumption.

No matter what choice of machine shoppers go for, ownership of computers has increased steadily and 80% of households now own one, compared with 72% in 2006. Multiple ownership is also becoming common: 40% of households have two or more computers, according to GMI. It appears that while a desktop tends to be shared in a household, laptops are considered personal devices, more in line with mobile phones, so family members often have their own.

Computers of all types remain a big-ticket item, but price deflation has been widespread, because processing power is becoming less expensive The price of all information processing equipment, from computers to printers, has dropped by 59% in the six years to June 2011, compared with inflation of 19% over the same period.

The one blip in this trend might come as a result of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan this year. A major supplier of components for computers, Japanese production was severely affected by the disaster.

When it comes to buying a computer, the options are almost endless and include electronic retailers, department stores, online generalist stores, specialists, supermarkets, direct from the manufacturer, and so on.

The proliferation of options has put pressure on electronics retailers, but they are still the most likely purchase source, used by 43% of UK consumers for their most recent computer purchase, according to GMI.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Smaller Devices Mult Iply Sales
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.