Advantage Union

By Zirin, Dave | The Progressive, November 2011 | Go to article overview

Advantage Union


Zirin, Dave, The Progressive


When we think out the pro tennis tour--with its starched whites, seven-figure paydays, and country club environs-the first thing that pops up isn't, "Those guys need a union." In other sports--like the remorseless brutality of boxing or the death march of professional cycling--the need for a union where none exists seems like common sense. But surely not in the genteel land of tennis.

Think again. There is a growing roar among the top players in the game that they will organize and go on strike if their demands are not heard.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

What demands, you may ask? During the U.S. Open, players had to take the court for three consecutive days to make up for rain delays, and they had to play on wet and dangerous surfaces for part of the tournament. They then were given one day off before having to fly to Europe for the Davis Cup.

A strike "is a possibility," said Andy Murray, the world's number four player. "Let's hope it doesn't come to that, but I'm sure the players will consider it. We need to have some say in what goes on in our sport.... We just want things to change, really small things. Two or three weeks off during the year, a few less tournaments each year, which I don't think is unreasonable."

The constant rain and chaotic schedule at the U.S. Open brought much of the ongoing griping of the pro tennis tour out into the open. The great Rafael Nadal, Murray, and star U.S. player Andy Roddick confronted tournament referee Brian Earley when they were rushed onto a damp court they were told was dry. After Earley insisted this wouldn't happen again, water began to actually seep through the cracks of Louis Armstrong Stadium the following day. It was so bad that announcers John McEnroe, Brad Gilbert, and Chris Evert openly talked on the telecast about the importance of getting a union so players could protect their very safety. McEnroe even went on a six-minute discourse--an unheard of amount of time on broadcast television--to discuss the history of tennis players who had tried to organize. He ended by saying, "There is no player union, and that's the crux of the issue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Advantage Union
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.