Lead from Behind in Syria; the Arab States Are Steps Ahead of Obama Foreign Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

Lead from Behind in Syria; the Arab States Are Steps Ahead of Obama Foreign Policy


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Arab League is taking the initiative on dealing with the crisis in Syria. It remains to be seen if the White House is ready to fall in and lead from behind.

On Saturday, the Arab League voted overwhelmingly to suspend Syria until a way could be found peacefully to end the eight-month uprising against the regime of Bashar Assad. The vote comes in response to Damascus flouting a league-brokered plan that was supposed to have ended the violence. More bad news for Mr. Assad quickly followed. On Monday, Jordan's King Abdullah II called for Mr. Assad to step down and help usher in a new phase of Syrian political life. Beijing broke with Damascus and came out in support of the Arab League's actions. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the future could not be built on the blood of the oppressed, and Syrian rebels rejected proposed talks with the regime. They just want Mr. Assad out.

The Arab League vote clears the way for the United States finally to take concerted action against Syria. It meets the Obama administration's key foreign-policy litmus test of never doing anything that might offend an Arab leader, except those too weak to fight back. America already has announced a policy of seeking a regime change in Syria. We have consistently said that President Assad must lead a democratic transition or get out of the way, President Obama said in August. He has not led. For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside.

Syrian rebels have taken heart from NATO's role in the downfall of Moammar Gadhafi's regime in Libya, which the Obama administration said was a model use of smart power. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lead from Behind in Syria; the Arab States Are Steps Ahead of Obama Foreign Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.