We Must Not Cut Literacy Teaching

The Evening Standard (London, England), November 23, 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

We Must Not Cut Literacy Teaching


IT WAS heartening to read about Kostyantin Zhevago's generous benefaction to St Mary's Primary and the enthusiastic response of volunteers to your reading campaign.

As if the worrying statistics on reading standards weren't enough, however, I am still shocked at the denial of funding to existing, highly successful one-to-one initiatives, notably the excellent Reading Recovery programme. Reading Recovery teachers are classroom teachers who are trained intensively in-post to deliver a 20-week specialist programme to those pupils in most need, early in their school career.

The current reality is that most schools, having just scraped the budget together for a fully trained RR teacher last year, will no doubt have recalled that teacher to a mainstream class to preserve their highly stretched staff team. If the school is inventive, it may have a system of reading partners from City firms, or perhaps have found a way to finance the delivery of the programme by an unqualified but willing teaching assistant so some form of intervention is preserved, albeit hand-to-mouth. Why should our children's future success be compromised so? One-to-one teaching offers the prospect of steady progress in reading ability, and the promise of much else. If ministers won't generate the funds needed for our children to succeed, we must take the initiative ourselves. Mr Zhevago demonstrates that there are people out there with the money and the will to give.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

We Must Not Cut Literacy Teaching
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?