From Crook to Criminology Graduate; David Tells His Story in a Bid to Help Others

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), November 30, 2011 | Go to article overview

From Crook to Criminology Graduate; David Tells His Story in a Bid to Help Others


Byline: LEE MADDISON

A REFORMED criminal who admits once trying to stab a man to death in a pub wants to help other offenders get their lives back on track.

David Honeywell, of Redcar, spent a large part of his early life behind bars, but now wants others to learn from the errors of his ways.

More than 10 years after being released for the last time, David has achieved two degrees at Teesside University. He is also a freelance writer, has written a book about his life and has applied for funding to establish Breaking Free - a social enterprise aimed at giving persistent young offenders support to change.

After spending years trying to forget his troubled past, David, 48, decided to speak out after seeing the London riots.

He said: "Watching the riots and the whole discussion about the way kids are today, I knew I could relate to them because I had been there."

David's autobiography, Never Ending Circles, tracks his development from a shy kid growing up in Grangetown, through his troubled years to the realisation he had to change and how he did it.

He was first convicted, aged 20, for two attempted robberies, resulting in a 30-month youth custody sentence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Crook to Criminology Graduate; David Tells His Story in a Bid to Help Others
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.