Citation Tracking Citings and Sightings

By Weisbard, Phyllis Holman | Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Citation Tracking Citings and Sightings


Weisbard, Phyllis Holman, Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources


Good news on the "cited reference" front: the pioneer cited reference source ISI (Web of Knowledge/Web of Science) is no longer the main game in town for tracking forward the influence of a journal article by finding out where it is cited. This is good for women's studies scholars, since the Web of Science (WOS) approach has always been a decidedly flawed tool for the field.

Since WOS is so well accepted, however, its good to understand a bit about how it works before moving on to the newer citation trackers. Bear with me: this is subtle and technical, but I'll try to make it understandable. WOS is made up of three databases: Science Citation Index (SCI) does full indexing of 6,650 "major journals" from 1900 through the present; Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), full indexing of over 1,950 journals plus "selected, relevant items from over 3,300 of the world's leading scientific and technical journals" from 1956 through the present; and Arts & Humanities Citation (A&HCI) Index, full coverage of 1,160 journals and "selected, relevant items from over 6,800 major science and social science journals" from 1975 through the present.

The first use of WOS, therefore, is as a straightforward resource leading to the indexed articles. These indexes can be searched separately or together. Most women's studies topics are best searched across SSCI and A&HCI together, because although SSCI includes women's studies among the "disciplines covered," there's nothing explicit about women's studies in the comparable list for A&HCI--yet we know that many women's studies journals exist in the arts and humanities and that women/gender-related articles are frequently published in other arts and humanities journals as well. Leaving out SCI is helpful when one is interested in the social aspects of contraceptives, breast cancer, and other women's health topics, when inclusion of purely scientific/medical articles in a results list will just be confounding. However, WOS is an incomplete resource for women's studies topics because it does not index numerous important women's studies journals, among them Journal of Lesbian Studies, Feminist Media Studies, Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, Politics & Gender, NWSA Journal/Feminist Formations, Gender in Management, Gender & Language, Gender & History, Yale Journal of Law and Feminism (or most other law reviews focusing on women/gender/feminism), Women & Performance, Women in Judaism^ and Women's Studies Quarterly* Since we have better tools, such as the database Women's Studies International, for capturing women's studies publishing, this gap in WOS coverage is mainly of passing annoyance (as in, "Gee, why don't they include these journals?").

But the "power" built into WOS that I wish to describe in detail is that it traces forward where a particular article has been cited. For example: you are interested in how often and where Anne McClintock's article "Family Feuds: Gender, Nationalism, and the Family," Feminist Review vol. 44 (Summer 1993), pp. 61-80, has been cited to date. Feminist Review is one of the journals indexed by WOS. Here's how to run that search, which is illustrated in Figure A:

[1] Select the Web of Science tab from the Web of Knowledge opening screen.

[2] Select its "Cited Reference Search" tab.

[3] Deselect SCI and leave SSCI and A&HCI checked.

[4] Enter the bibliographic information about the article, paying attention to the WOS format, and click on "Search."

[FIGURE A OMITTED]

Figure B shows that WOS finds various hits corresponding to the article in question. Select them all, and click on "Finish Search." WOS now displays 78 items citing the McClintock article, as recent as in the latest issue (vol. 16, no. 4, 2010) of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (see Figure C), as displayed at UW-Madison, including "Find-It" links to availability of the items on that campus. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Citation Tracking Citings and Sightings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.