Helen Edwards on Branding: Blurred Visionaries

Marketing, December 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Helen Edwards on Branding: Blurred Visionaries


Too many marketers are hiding behind grand statements that actually mean little to consumers.

These are the MKJs (marketing knee-jerk statements) that I hear at pretty much every workshop and brainstorm that I moderate. They are harmless in their way, and occasionally some even make sense, but they can also be a symptom of an insidious malaise: creeping obfuscation.

In these tough times, marketers need all the clarity of thought that they can muster. So let's make an early resolution to resist MKJs in 2012 - or at least to think before we speak.

MKJ one: We want to be a challenger brand This was Adam Morgan's big idea back in 1999, with the publication of Eating the Big Fish, and what a monster it turned out to be. Back then, it was about the little guy outthinking the big guy, but today, marketers of brands of all sizes want to be challengers. Many don't know what it involves, but they love the way it seems.

The problem is that if they all succeeded, there would be no one left to challenge. What's wrong with gravitas, leadership and scale? If your brand has those qualities endemically, no amount of 'challenger' narrative is going to make it seem fashionably alternative, sassy and 'street'.

MKJ two: We don't want to be just a problem/solution brand Someone must once have shown that 'negative' branding is bad, and somehow that spilled over into squeamishness about the P-word. If your brand can solve one of life's problems - colds, breakdowns, stains, pains - then it is a knight in shining armour. Far better to write it large than go all fey and build a positioning around undifferentiated 'positive' notions such as 'liberation'.

MKJ three: We're looking for a 'Marmite' Translation: we are feeling bold and outrageous and want a positioning that, frankly, is going to turn off as many people as it seduces, and we REALLY DON'T CARE about that, in fact we are going to shout it to the hills.

Polarity is much-loved in our industry. However, some of the most successful brands - Ford, Coke, John Lewis - succeed through precisely the opposite strategy: inclusiveness.

MKJ four: We want to be the 'Apple' of ... Everyone wants to be Apple.

No matter that they make fish fingers, lubricants or face-wipes, the darling of Silicon Valley is the only one to emulate.

Trouble is, no one wants to be as crazily obsessive about the micro-detail of product design as the late Steve Jobs. Except, perhaps, the next Steve Jobs. …

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