Preeze Frame

By Turri, Scott | Afterimage, November-December 2011 | Go to article overview

Preeze Frame


Turri, Scott, Afterimage


Ragnar Kjartansson: Song

Carnegie Museum of Art

Pittsburgh

March 11-September 25, 2011

It is always a thrill to experience some form of music in a museum or gallery, but rarely do the two intersect. Popular music, the egalitarian medium, does not often fit into the more elitist gallery and museum setting. Fun and humor are also often missing in this environment as well. Yet artists like Bruce Nauman, Richard Prince, and David Shrigley bring humor to the table. Laurie Anderson successfully combines performance and music, and the Talking Heads did so on a commercial scale with Stop Making Sense (1984). Phil Collins's video installation "the world won't listen" (2004-07), which featured karaoke of the Smiths, with its ability to reflect pop culture, and blend high and low art and humor perhaps has the most relevance to Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson, who taps into the spirit of the aforementioned artists, combining music, performance, and humor in his installation "The End" (2008), one of four pieces that make up "Song," his first solo museum show in the United States and the 66th installment of Carnegie Museum of Art's "Forum" series.

Unlike the traditional music video, in which the viewer is bombarded with a frenetic pace of edited sequences of pscudonarratives and/or images of band members from a variety of camera angles slickly packaged into a 31/2-minute ADHD-inspired bitter pill, Kjartansson's work defies these conventions. "The End" features five large projections assembled from footage of musicians, including Kjartansson himself, performing in fur hats, coats, and boots in remote snow-covered locations. He and the musicians play a variety of instruments in four of the five projections, including guitars, banjos, and drums; in the other, a lone piano player bangs away in a snow-covered valley before a majestic mountain. In the installation, the viewer could see and hear what each musician is playing in each projection, and although the projections feature the same people playing in different locations, all play the same song synchronized to form one large band. At the center of the room, one could hear all of the parts as a whole. The song labors on at times, seemingly about to end on a number of occasions, but it is not until a guitar is tossed down a snow-covered hill, as if raising the white flag of surrender, that the piece finally comes to its conclusion. All of the footage is shot from one static vantage point devoid of any cuts. Watching the performers without the distraction of editing reinforces the feeling of a live performance. Kjartansson enables the viewer to become the editor, free to make decisions about how to consume the work based on positioning and how many projections are viewed at once, alone, or in combination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Preeze Frame
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.