Penn State's Exemption in State Law Limits Probe; Internal Records Not Open to Public, Press

By Fenno, Nathan | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Penn State's Exemption in State Law Limits Probe; Internal Records Not Open to Public, Press


Fenno, Nathan, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Nathan Fenno, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Transparency has been the pledge of interim Penn State President Rodney Erickson in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal, from a universitywide email Nov. 10 to last week's on-campus town hall meeting.

Despite receiving $279 million from the state this year, Penn State is considered a state-related school - along with Lincoln, Pittsburgh and Temple - and thus is exempt from the open-records law that applies to Pennsylvania's 14 public universities.

They carved out a niche for themselves, said Terry Mutchler, executive director of the state's office of open records. It's befuddling to the citizens of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania about how they sit down and write a check for $279 million and [Penn State doesn't] have accountability to taxpayers.

Because of the exemption, data such as emails between Penn State administrators about Mr. Sandusky, telephone records, details of legal fees, contracts, minutes of meetings and more are shielded from public view.

Alaska and Delaware are the only otherstates to use similar exemptions.

Pennsylvania state legislators are rushing to remove the unusual loophole from the state's open-records act. Penn State President Graham B. Spanier, who has since been fired, campaigned vigorously for the exemption.

On Dec. 5, state Rep. Eugene DePasquale, a Democrat, introduced legislation to amend the open-records law to include the four state-related schools, calling the move imperative and significant. Part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education, the four schools are classified as receiving state funds but independently controlled. The 14 other public schools belong to the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

In a Nov. 28 memo to fellow senators seeking a co-sponsor for his legislation, state Sen. John P. Blake, a Democrat, asserted that revamped open-records laws may have brought the sad, unfortunate and utterly distasteful facts of this case to light much sooner.

The flood of open-records requests that usually accompany a public university's scandal - Ohio State received 150 requests regarding former coach Jim Tressel; Oregon had 105 requests related to its relationship with street agent Willie Lyles - won't work at Penn State. At Ohio State and Oregon, requests included telephone records, emails and contracts related to the cases.

Under Pennsylvania's open-records law, enacted by the legislature in 2008, Penn State is obligated to release only its top 25 salaries, those of officers and directors plus information on the Internal Revenue Service's Form 990. The state-related schools weren't included in the law's previous version.

Before that, they weren't obligated to do anything at all, said Kim de Bourbon, executive director of the Pennsylvania Freedom of Information Coalition. "It's a very secretive organization. .. There's nothing like a huge

national scandal to cause change"

The Associated Press, for example, requested a copy of Mr. Sandusky's severance agreement with Penn State, emails about the former defensive coordinator and information related to the university's 1998 investigation of him. …

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Penn State's Exemption in State Law Limits Probe; Internal Records Not Open to Public, Press
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