THE BBC AND AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE; A Devastating Report Lays Bare the BBC's Endemic Bias on Global Warming

Daily Mail (London), December 8, 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

THE BBC AND AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE; A Devastating Report Lays Bare the BBC's Endemic Bias on Global Warming


Byline: by Christopher Booker

FROM its breathtaking footage of killer whales hunting in packs to the scenes of penguins swimming with balletic grace under the sea ice, Sir David Attenborough's BBC series Frozen Planet has been acclaimed as perhaps the most riveting sequence of natural history programmes ever produced.

The sophistication of the photography, the extraordinary endeavour of the film crews to get the best shots and Sir David's breathily authoritative commentary have had viewers entranced in their millions.

Last night's was the final part of this landmark series, and it set a very different tone from his usual celebration of the natural world. This was because Sir David and the BBC decided to use the last programme to put over a particular message that has become all too familiar from the Corporation in recent years.

Sir David used the awesome shots of the frozen polar wastes to hammer home his belief that the world is facing disaster from man-made global warming.

No one can doubt the passion of his belief. But in putting across his apocalyptic message so forcefully, too many important questions on this hugely important subject were last night neither asked nor answered,

Distorted

In short, it was a deeply disappointing end to the series -- for it was the latest one of countless examples of how, in recent years, the BBC has chosen to make its coverage of one of the most crucial issues of our time quite deliberately, even defiantly one-sided.

The BBC is committed by its charter to report with 'accuracy and impartiality'. Yet on climate change, it has adopted a clear 'party line', which has run through almost every aspect of its broadcasting.

Earlier this year, when the Mail serialised the memoirs of the respected former BBC news reporter and anchorman Peter Sissons, his insider's view explained how the BBC had become 'a propaganda machine for climate-change zealots'.

So distorted has the BBC's coverage become that I produced a detailed report on the subject for the Global Warming Policy Foundation, the 'sceptical' think-tank run by former Chancellor Lord (Nigel) Lawson, which is published today.

My disturbing findings show that the problem began a few years ago when the alarm over global warming was at its height. Al Gore's Oscarwinning film An Inconvenient Truth -- a sensationalist documentary warning of the imminent destruction of our planet because of climate change -- was packing in vast audiences and being circulated to our schools to show to children.

Tony Blair was putting global warming at the top of his government's agenda. The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (the IPCC) was producing its scariest report to date.

At a secret 'high-level seminar' in January 2006, 30 of the BBC's most senior staff listened as a former president of the Royal Society, Lord May, told them that 'the scientific debate over climate change' was over, and that the BBC must 'stop reporting the sceptics'.

As a result, the BBC adopted a new editorial policy line, throwing any obligation to impartiality to the winds.

The BBC's journalists and producers were let off the leash -- to line up with the more extreme environmental pressure groups, such as Greenpeace, the World Wildlife Fund and Friends of the Earth, in pushing their global warming agenda for all it was worth.

This bias was soon evident across the whole of the BBC's output. Not just in the news and current affairs coverage, but from children's programmes such as Blue Peter -- which titled one show Green Peter, with top tips to save the planet -- to story-lines in The Archers, one of which involved a farmer planting trees to combat climate change.

Even producers of the BBC Proms got in on the act. In 2007 they commissioned a 'music drama' centred on a group of children who had lost their homes through floods caused by climate change.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

THE BBC AND AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE; A Devastating Report Lays Bare the BBC's Endemic Bias on Global Warming
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?