Couldry, Nick. Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics after Neoliberalism

By McAnany, Emile | Communication Research Trends, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Couldry, Nick. Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics after Neoliberalism


McAnany, Emile, Communication Research Trends


Couldry, Nick. Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics after Neoliberalism. Los Angeles: Sage, 2010. Pp. viii, 176. ISBN 978-1-84860-661-6 (cloth) $108.00; 978-1-84860-662-3 (paper) $40.95.

The challenge of this book comes in the first sentence: "Human beings can give an account of themselves and of their place in the world: 'we have no idea,' writes Paul Ricoeur, 'what a culture would be where no one any longer knew what it meant to narrate things'" (p. 1). It is this theme that pulls the argument along through seven chapters and gives a very interesting analysis of the challenge of "voice" in our times. What is perhaps less compelling is the precise role of neoliberalism in the suppression of peoples' voices. It is not the author's critique of neoliberalism in the realms of economics, democracy, and the media (in Chapters 3, 4, and 5) that gives pause but the claim that it is neoliberalism's role in suppressing voice. The author's argument is best seen in the structure of the book.

In Chapter 1 the basic argument is laid out. Neoliberalisms's rationality "relies on an excessive valuation of markets" so much so that "there is no other valid principle of human organization than market functioning" (p. 11). It is here, perhaps, early in the book that the issue of an implied causal connection between neoliberalism's ideology and the many miseries of modern life (including the suppression of voice) in the exemplar neoliberalism countries of the UK and the USA suggests closer reading. In Chapter 2, Couldry takes on neoliberalism's economic foundations, but not to critique the current crisis but to begin what he calls a "cultural critique" of its "economic discourse" (p. 23). The chapter begins to demonstrate the wide base for the author's scholarship not only with its 173 footnotes in a little more than 20 pages of text but also in his ability to arrange a wide array of authors in a way to make his argument compelling. In Chapter 3 the same kind of argument continues in the arena of politics. The author makes the case about the Blair years, arguing that despite a Labor platform that promoted equality and justice, the actual policies of the government were contradictory to those goals. He finishes the chapter with a look at some theoretical proposals for a new democracy. Finally in Chapter 4, the author gets to an area of his professional expertise, the media.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Couldry, Nick. Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics after Neoliberalism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.