Public Education's No. 1 Problem: Lack of Accountability

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), October 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Public Education's No. 1 Problem: Lack of Accountability


Byline: Douglas Vaughan

A fundamental truth about public education in Oregon, including the state's universities, is that the emperor has no clothes.

The United States is ranked 16th in a comparison of global education. Test scores from the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment show that out of 34 countries, the United States ranked 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in math globally.

Yet, spending per student remains higher in the United States than in other counties.

Most shocking is that this year's 15th annual edition of "Quality Counts" from Education Weekly ranks Oregon 42nd out 50 states and the District of Columbia. In two specific areas Oregon received failing grades. One of Oregon's F grades was for a lack of accountability. The National Assessment of Educational Progress used the word "awful" to describe the lack of achievements of Oregon public education compared to other states.

Unbelievable, you may say - especially if you had attended Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy's education forum last December. Raves about Eugene schools as being "top notch" and offering "world-class education" were sung by elected officials and political lobbyists to teachers' union and school board members. But facts speak otherwise.

From academic achievement to school funding and its use, Oregonians can no longer afford to ignore the destructive realities of half truths and lies. Public education in Oregon should be called out for what it is - an embarrassment!

For example, the Eugene School District does not have a funding crisis, as some in the public eye would hope to have citizens believe. Accountability is truly the No. 1 crisis facing public education today. Responsibilities for oversight of academic achievement and accountable management of resources in the name of the public trust are simply not being met.

The Civic Stadium debacle is a prime example of the continuing mismanagement of public resources. Another is this year's University of Oregon's salary increases, in defiance of common sense.

Still another stumbling block for accountability is the political shell game so skillfully managed under so-called grass-root organizations such as Stand for Children and Strong for Schools.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Public Education's No. 1 Problem: Lack of Accountability
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.