A Windfall during a Divorce Could Fan the Flames of Rancour; THURSDAY ESSAY A Lottery Win Can Add Fuel to a Bitter Divorce Says Madeline Rand, Director of Family Law Firm RLE Law. She Explains What Rights Separating Spouses Have If One of Them Strikes It Lucky

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

A Windfall during a Divorce Could Fan the Flames of Rancour; THURSDAY ESSAY A Lottery Win Can Add Fuel to a Bitter Divorce Says Madeline Rand, Director of Family Law Firm RLE Law. She Explains What Rights Separating Spouses Have If One of Them Strikes It Lucky


Byline: Madeline Rand

* OR richer, for poorer: Do spouses have any right to lottery winnings? A landmark case, the first of its kind, has given guidance to lawyers on how lottery winnings should be split in the event of divorce.

As recent lottery winners in the UK have won some of the highest ever jackpots, putting them firmly on the country's rich lists in front of the likes of David Bowie and Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne, what kind of rights do spouses now have if separating from a partner who has matched those big money balls? What does it mean for couples struggling to divide a cash prize after their relationship has ended?.

"It's a sad fact of life that sometimes, the things you wanted to share with your partner as a married couple will be the things that you want to keep for yourself during a divorce.

We often hear of what happens to assets of a marriage, such as houses, during these separations, but what happens when you or your partner have had the luck to win a cash prize during or before a divorce? "This was discussed in a recent case where a hotel porter attempted to sue his former wife for a proportion of her lottery win, with which she had invested pounds 275,000 in a home for the family in London, now worth pounds 500,000.

"He argued that he was entitled to a share of the money, which is ex wife had won some 10 years previously with a ticket she had bought on her own, without his knowledge.

"The court indicated that if the couple operated as a syndicate whereby they purchased a ticket with joint money for the benefit of them both, then the prize would have been shared equally.

"However, it was ruled that, because the money was won by the wife, but was invested into the relationship through the purchase of a family home, the husband should be awarded a lump sum of pounds 85,000.

"This ruling suggests that, had the wife not invested a significant proportion of her winnings into the family home, then the husband would not have been entitled to anything, despite the fact that she bought the ticket during the marriage and with income generated in the course of the marriage.

"The impact this has, is that it encourages spouses to keep their assets separate from their partners, to protect them from one another should the relationship end.

"In the past, any money accrued during a marriage would be considered a joint asset and would be split equally. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Windfall during a Divorce Could Fan the Flames of Rancour; THURSDAY ESSAY A Lottery Win Can Add Fuel to a Bitter Divorce Says Madeline Rand, Director of Family Law Firm RLE Law. She Explains What Rights Separating Spouses Have If One of Them Strikes It Lucky
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.