Proud History of Publishing; City's Link with Newspaper Ventures Goes Back to 1855

The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia), December 24, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Proud History of Publishing; City's Link with Newspaper Ventures Goes Back to 1855


Byline: Times Past with Beryl Johnston

THE first issue of the aIpswich Heralda which later became The Queensland Times, was July 4, 1859.

There had been an earlier paper, aThe North Australiana, first issued on Tuesday, October 2, 1855, but its machinery was transferred to Brisbane in 1863.

The Herald's office was in Ellenborough St, Ipswich, in a building which had previously been a hotel and later a ginger beer factory.

The new proprietors of The Herald, Messrs Hugh Parkinson, J Bowring Sloman and Francis Kidner, changed the name to The Queensland Times in October 1861, which it still is today.

The QT was published for the first time as a daily newspaper in October 1890, but a depression which followed caused the paper to return to its earlier publishing days of only three times a week. But by 1908, The QT was being issued again as a daily newspaper.

It is recorded that over a period of years, The QT had 11 editors and seven managers.

The editors were Messrs C J Thompson, George Butterfield, Joseph Butterfield, Dr Carr Boyd, John Irwin, John Woolley who held the position for 20 years, A Robinson, F J Meacham, K S McGill, E J Hutton and C Cook.

Managers were listed as being Messrs Hugh Parkinson Snr, A J Stephenson, Alf Robinson, W E Lingard, F J Meacham from 1928 to 1942, Walter Bruce and Bruce Mills.

Among advertisers in The QT on April 8, 1862 were Dr O'Doherty, Forbes Building, Thorn St, Ipswich; Williams Potts opposite the Post Office, Queen St, Brisbane; E Geach & Co, Market St, East Sydney; Wm Hendren & Co Drapery, East St, Ipswich and W Trotter who erected tombstones etc, cnr Bell and Brisbane sts, Ipswich.

An item taken from The North Australian on October 2, 1855, reads ASSAULT: At the police office, Mary Hale, the hired servant of Mrs Susan Brown alias Mrs Fox, appeared to prefer a charge of assault against her mistress.

The facts, having been admitted by the defendant's attorney Mr Macalister, Mrs Fox was convicted and ordered to pay the sum of 10 shillings plus seven shillings and sixpence costs.

A similar charge brought against her for striking a constable was withdrawn on payment of costs.

From The Moreton Bay Courier of June 20, 1846, comes this message: aTo Thomas Davies, supposed to be in the employ of Mr Farquharson Esq.

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