Disappointed in Form Letter Reply

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 24, 2011 | Go to article overview

Disappointed in Form Letter Reply


Disappointed in form letter reply

I am very disappointed with U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam. He always indicates that he wants to hear from us. I took him up on his offer and wrote a letter contesting his stance on an issue.

I received a letter back stating his position further. After reading it thoroughly, I noted some inaccuracies and misconceptions.

I wrote back to him pointing these out and included supporting documentation. I eagerly awaited his reply. When it came I was disappointed. The reply was the same form letter I got the first time.

It's obvious that no one read the letter beyond the topic so that the appropriate form letter could be selected for reply. I'm sorry, Rep. Roskam, but this is not wanting to "hear from me."

So, you know that campaign pledge I made? I'll be keeping my word, just like you did.

Terry Tallian

Wood Dale

Gerson shows he's naive on Sharia law

When Michael Gerson was writing speeches for George W. Bush he was at his best. When he tries to pontificate about Speaker Gingrich's warning that Sharia law is a moral threat to the survival of freedom in the United States, he exposes himself as naive.

He appeared even more slapdash than he branded Dinesh D'Souza to be in his evaluation of Barack Obama's anti-colonial attitudes. Of course, Sharia law application seems mild, and is promulgated by liberals and resident Muslims as being nonthreatening.

But Gerson turns a blind eye to what Sharia law looks like in countries and regions where Islam with its Sharia law is in ascendancy.

History has shown this as the global strategy of Islam appeasement and accommodation until gradual control is achieved.

One of the foremost scholars of Islam, Harvard University sociologist, Samuel Huntington, author of Clash of Civilizations, strongly affirmed Sharia law as being totally incompatible with U.S. Constitutional government. Gingrich was only stating what Huntington and scores of others have said.

I would like to see Michael Gerson in debate with either Gingrich on Sharia law or with Dinesh D'Souza about Barack Obama's devotional attachment to the anti-colonial sentiments of his Kenyan father. Without a scintilla of supportable counter-argument, Gerson, writing such a column in The Washington Post, forfeits his own reputation and credibility with me.

To the editors of The Daily Herald, I believe you can find a columnist with a little more to offer your readers.

Wightman Weese

Wheaton

Corporate tax breaks aren't chump change

I've been reading for months now in your paper on how the state of Illinois has many financial problems and can't pay their bills. In the Dec. 16 paper the subject once again comes up about how the state is losing tax dollars by not collecting sales tax on Internet sales.

Your paper states that "local businesses are hurting and Illinois is losing revenue when it can least afford it." I find this statement interesting. It seems like when it comes to sales tax and personal income tax, we can never do without it.

I remember many years ago Illinois was going to eliminate the sales tax on food over a period of years. The sales tax was lowered, but never eliminated, because the state found out they couldn't live without the revenue. But yet, when it comes to Illinois corporations, it's amazing how much revenue we can do without. …

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